Feb 23, 2020  
2019-2020 Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Agribusiness

  
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    AB 1100 - Intro to Agribusiness


    Intro to Agribusiness

    3 Credits
  
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    AB 2225 - Agricultural Economics


    The purpose of the course is to provide a basic understanding of microeconomic principles relating to the production, processing, distribution and utilization of agricultural commodities. The course includes basic concepts relating to the management of agribusiness enterprises and agricultural resources allocation.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    AB 3000 - Selected Topics


    3 Hours and 3 Credits

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    AB 3115 - National Agri-Marketing


    A team training experience structured to develop creativity, communication and presentation abilities as well as interpersonal skills. Students work throughout the year preparing a marketing plan, conducting market research and developing financial projections, then present their work during the National Agri-Marketing Association Conference in April. A GPA of 2.2 must be maintained. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

    Prerequisite(s):   

    1 to 4 hours Participation
    1 credit per year
  
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    AB 3116 - National Agri-Marketing


    A team training experience structured to develop creativity, communication and presentation abilities as well as interpersonal skills. Students work throughout the year preparing a marketing plan, conducting market research and developing financial projections, then present their work during the National Agri-Marketing Association Conference in April. A GPA of 2.2 must be maintained. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

    Prerequisite(s):  

    1 to 4 hours Participation
    1 credit per year
  
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    AB 3117 - National Agri-Marketing


    A team training experience structured to develop creativity, communication and presentation abilities as well as interpersonal skills. Students work throughout the year preparing a marketing plan, conducting market research and developing financial projections, then present their work during the National Agri-Marketing Association Conference in April. A GPA of 2.2 must be maintained. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

    Prerequisite(s):  

    1 to 4 hours Participation
    1 credit per year
  
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    AB 3126 - Agricultural Marketing


    The course provides students with a comprehensive view of the marketing of agricultural commodities, foods, fibers, and agricultural supplies. Concepts relating to preparation for careers in agri-marketing are emphasized. Basic principles of advertising and retailing are included.

    Prerequisite(s): AB 2225 - Agricultural Economics .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    AB 3130 - Agricultural Markets and Prices


     3  hours Lecture  and  Discussion - 3 credits

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    AB 3150 - Global Agriculture and Trade


     3  hours Lecture  and  Discussion - 3 credits

    3 Hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 Credits
  
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    AB 3170 - Economics of Agricultural Technology


     3  hours Lecture  and  Discussion - 3 credits

    3 Hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 Credits
  
  
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    AB 4242 - Food and Agricultural Policy


    Develops a basic understanding of the role of government in the development of domestic farm policy, policies affecting food and consumers, also international trade in food and agricultural products. Emphasis is placed on contemporary issues, which include: the structure of agriculture, nutrition policies, food safety, resource preservation and utilization, and price support programs.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites include: AB 2225 - Agricultural Economics , AB 3126 - Agricultural Marketing , and Junior or Senior status.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    AB 4243 - Agribusiness Management Agribusiness


    Management skills are developed through coursework and association with professionals in marketing, distribution, sales, production and international business. Emphasis is placed on developing decision-making abilities, communication skills, and intrapersonal competence.

    Prerequisite(s): AB 2225 - Agricultural Economics , AB 3126 - Agricultural Marketing , and Junior or Senior status.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    AB 4300 - Current Issues in Agriculture and Food


     3  hours Lecture  and  Discussion - 3 credits

    3 Hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 Credits
  
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    SR 4041 - Student Research


    This course is designed for students of all majors who are of sophomore status and above with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 who have a serious desire and potential to undertake a research project. After obtaining the approval of a faculty mentor, students intending to register for student research will need to submit a 1-2 page proposal to the Student Research Committee for approval. Proposals should include an abstract, project timeline, budget, and any funding requests. For registration in the fall semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than April 20th and for registration in the spring semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than Nov. 20th. Once approved, registration is through the student's departmental chair. Students, mentors and committee members will meet throughout the semester, with student presentations at the end of the semester.

    Contact hours dependent on number of credits registered for this course
    1-3 credits

Animal Biotechnology and Conservation

  
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    SA 1105 - Introduction to Animal Management


    This course emphasizes animal care and management in relation to animal characteristics, control, handling, restraint, animal facility design, and legal compliance. Students will become acquainted with a variety of animals, their origin, characteristics, and usage. Basic technologies will be introduced in the laboratory component of the course.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 2001 - People and Animals


    The student will learn about the relationship between people and animals through domestication, religion, culture, farming, research and pets. The role of pets in the family will be examined. The role of animals in human health and the effect of humans on animals will also be discussed.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    SA 2101 - Animal Assisted Activities and Therapy


    The course explores the use of AAA and AAT in different fields including education, psychology and physical therapy. By exploring the different areas, students will learn how to develop, present and implement an AAA/AAT program and gain an understanding of the responsibilities that go along with such programs.

    Prerequisite(s): SA 2001 - People and Animals .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    SA 2110 - Introduction to Zoo Keeping


    This course will explore the major aspects of caring for captive wildlife and responsible collection management. We will emphasize both the limitations and positive impact zoos have on conservation. Topics covered will include, but are not limited to, responsible stewardship, population management, captive breeding, reintroduction, nutrition and feeding, health, reproduction, observation, and the design and care of exhibits.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    SA 2113 - Wild Animals in Captivity


    Wildlife care and management is a scientific discipline requiring specialized training. This course emphasizes the development of care and management procedures in captive wildlife. Restricted to Zoo Science, B.S.  majors.

    Prerequisite(s): SA 2110 - Introduction to Zoo Keeping .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 2218 - Animal Training and Enrichment


    Operant conditioning and basic principles of animal psychology are explored. Students will learn how to use these principles to train both domestic and wild animals and to improve their psychological wellbeing in captivity. Major components of enrichment will be reviewed with respect to the principles of animal management. This course provides the hands-on experience needed to apply behavioral techniques to the management of captive populations.

    Prerequisite(s):   and   or   and  

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 2220 - Animal Record Keeping Systems


    This course introduces students to data collection, record keeping, studbook analysis, and the specialized software used by zoos for animal information systems and collection management. Students will learn to complete accurate records for daily husbandry, medical care, species inventory and shipping and use computer technology to access data, transform that data into information, and communicate that information to others.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 1011 - Information Technology Concepts , IT 1012 - Computer Applications  and  .

    2 hours Lecture and Discussion
    2 credits
  
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    SA 3000 - Selected Topics I


    Special projects are designed to meet individual needs of students in their respective fields. Projects will be arranged on a one-to-one basis with a department faculty member and with the approval of the Department Chairperson. A maximum of two credits will be accepted toward graduation.

    3 hours student/faculty instruction per week
    1 credit
  
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    SA 3032 - Herpetology


    This course explores the major aspects of the biology of amphibians and reptiles. The structure and function of these animals as individuals, populations, and biotic communities are examined. Aspects to be covered include the general anatomy of the "herptiles" and the evolution and taxonomy of modern reptiles and amphibians. A review of biodiversity and systematics is incorporated within the course.

    Prerequisite(s): BY 1116 - Biological Science I  and BY 1217 - Biological Science II  and AS 3118 - Animal Anatomy and Physiology .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 3034 - Mammalogy


    This course presents a broad overview of the field of mammalogy, including the evolution, structure, diversity, taxonomy, biogeography, and behavioral ecology of mammals. The laboratory component of the course emphasizes physical structure and development, field methods, and systematics, with an emphasis on local mammalian fauna.

    Prerequisite(s): BY 1116 - Biological Science I  and BY 1217 - Biological Science II  and AS 3118 - Animal Anatomy and Physiology ; students will be required to complete field work during evenings or weekends and prepare study skins.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 3050 - Animals in the Public Eye


    Cross-Listed As: ED 3050 

    Students in the Animal Biotechnology & Conservation Department will be faced with the responsibility of presenting the general public and school groups with accurate and understandable information on a daily basis. This information is most likely to be imparted through animal or artifact demonstrations in informal educational settings through one-on-one discussions (talking to the public), and small group presentations (keeper presentations, State Fairs). In addition, they are likely to be called upon to represent their institutions to the media during their careers. The course will provide experiential learning and will include animal/artifact presentations.

    Prerequisite(s):   and  

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    SA 3112 - Wildlife Management


    The process of managing wildlife presents a broad array of problems, from the protection of endangered species to the control or elimination of pests. This course applies major ecological concepts to the practice of wildlife management. In lecture, we will examine how ecological principles can be used to devise viable management strategies. The laboratory will be devoted largely to field methods for studying wildlife and current issues facing wildlife managers. Students are required to attend outside field trips.

    Prerequisite(s): BY 2108 - Ecology .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 3115 - Zoo Internship I: Animal Care


    This internship will allow students to work with keepers at one of several partner organizations to develop hands-on skills, including proper care, handling, restraint and behavioral observation of wild animals. The internship experience will culminate in a final project to be identified by the institution. Enrollment is limited to students in the Zoo Science, B.S.  major. Students must provide their own transportation to the zoo or aquarium.

    Prerequisite(s): SA 2110 - Introduction to Zoo Keeping  and SA 2113 - Wild Animals in Captivity 

    2 credits
  
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    SA 3124 - Animal Behavior


    An introduction to the analysis of animal behavior, emphasizing an evolutionary approach. Animal behavior is investigated, through both the ecological processes that have driven the evolution of behavior and the physiological mechanisms that allow behaviors to be performed. A major objective of the laboratory will be to foster a strong sense of how science proceeds. Students are encouraged to ask their own questions and design their own experiments, and will work in groups to determine goals, set predictions, create appropriate tests, and analyze results.

    Prerequisite(s): Required:  BY 1116 - Biological Science I  and BY 1217 - Biological Science II . Recommended: BY 2108 - Ecology .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 3133 - Aquatic Animal Science


    An examination of the history of animal keeping and present-day ornamental aquatic animal husbandry industries. The biological processes occurring in the aquarium environment are explored. Students will learn the proper set-up and maintenance of home aquaria, and the theory and application of aquarium science in the design, set-up and maintenance of aquarium systems. Topics will include but are not limited to the chemical, physical and biological environment, water quality, filtration, lighting, health and nutrition, and species compatibility. Lab will require the set-up and maintenance of a freshwater aquarium.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 3216 - Zoo Internship II: Public Education


    This internship will allow students to work with the educational staff at one of several partner organizations. Students will assist in teaching special classes to students from primary and secondary schools as part of the zoo's docent program or outreach efforts. They may also work with scouting programs, seniors, or other groups visiting the zoo for educational functions. The internship experience will culminate in a final project developed in partnership with the education staff at the zoo or aquarium. Enrollment is limited to students in the Zoo Science major. Students must provide their own transportation to the Zoo.

    Prerequisite(s): SA 2110 - Introduction to Zoo Keeping  and SA 2113 - Wild Animals in Captivity .

    2 credits
  
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    SA 3475 - Companion Animals


    This course examines the different species of companion animals with emphasis on behavior, nutrition, health concerns, physiology and animal care. The historical uses and domestication of various species are discussed along with keeping nondomesticated species as pets. Animal use in society is also discussed, including overpopulation, humane treatment, and animals for assistance purposes.

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    SA 4000 - Selected Topics II


    Special projects are designed to meet individual needs of students in their respective fields. Projects will be arranged on a one-to-one basis with a department faculty member and with the approval of the Department Chairperson. A maximum of two credits will be accepted toward graduation.

    3 hours student/faculty instruction per week
    1 credit
  
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    SA 4016 - Senior Seminar


    This course is a study of recent research within the field of animal biotechnology and conservation on topics selected by students with special emphasis on oral presentations.

    1 hour Lecture and Discussion
    1 credit
  
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    SA 4033 - Wildlife Conservation


    This course will explore issues related to the management of rare and endangered animals and their habitats. Population ecology, small population genetics, protected area design, population and habitat viability, ex situ conservation, population restoration, sociology of wildlife management, and endangered species policy will all be examined during the course.

    Prerequisite(s):  

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    SA 4050 - Canine Behavior and Training


    This course provides a historical, scientific, psychological and developmental look at humankind's best friend, the dog. Topics include, but are not limited to: specific breed types including selective breeding for behavioral traits, neuroendocrine and genetic basis of behavior; canine training and education; competitive activities; and current issues.

    Prerequisite(s):  

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    SA 4051 - Current Topics


    This research and discussion course emphasizes topics of current interest to the field of animal science and conservation. It may be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits.

    Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor.

    1 hour Lecture and Discussion
    1 credit
  
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    SA 4123 - Wildlife Health and Disease


    The management of wildlife species requires careful training in the prevention of disease outbreaks and cross-species contamination. This course addresses both the development and spread of disease in exotic collections and managing the risk of zoonotic diseases. Animal disease and wildlife and clinical pathology are examined as they apply to the management of wildlife.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 3118 - Animal Anatomy and Physiology .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 4124 - Pathology and Diseases of Small Animals


    This is an advanced course addressing the development of disease and the effect the process induces on tissues, organs, and the body. The course will also examine specific diseases or disease conditions of small animals.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 3118 - Animal Anatomy and Physiology , Senior Status, or permission of Instructor.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 4129 - Clinical Pathology


    This subspecialty of pathology is concerned with the theoretical and technical aspects (methods or procedures) of hematology, chemistry, immunology, parasitology, microbiology and biophysics as they pertain to the diagnosis of disease and the care of animal patients. This course stresses deductive reasoning.

    Prerequisite(s): SA 4124 - Pathology and Diseases of Small Animals  and AS 3118 - Animal Anatomy and Physiology .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 4222 - Reproduction of Small Animals


    This course examines the special problems encountered in small animal reproduction. Extensive laboratory experience emphasizes manipulation of the reproductive system, application of techniques utilizing hormones, fertilization, fetal development and in vitro manipulation of murine gametes and embryos.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 3118 - Animal Anatomy and Physiology  or permission of Instructor.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 4224 - Wildlife Nutrition


    This course examines the special nutritional problems posed by wild animals. Zoos contain hundreds of species, each representing a digestive strategy for a specific ecological niche. Students will combine information on natural history, historical records, and domestic animal models to design feeding programs for captive wildlife.

    Prerequisite(s): CH 2003 - Principles of Organic Chemistry  or CH 2120 - Organic Chemistry I .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SA 4225 - Small Animal Research Techniques


    Students are introduced to all phases of research from literature search, to planning and performing experiments, to the writing of a research paper. Further experience is gained in anesthesia, surgical techniques, and animal models of human disease. Transgenic technology is discussed and techniques are introduced. Techniques that reduce the number of animals used in research are stressed.

    Prerequisite(s):  , AS 3118 - Animal Anatomy and Physiology  and   or permission of Instructor. Recommended: SA 4222 - Reproduction of Small Animals .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    SR 4041 - Student Research


    This course is designed for students of all majors who are of sophomore status and above with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 and who have a serious desire and potential to undertake a research project. After obtaining the approval of a faculty mentor, students intending to register for Student Research will need to submit a 1-2 page proposal to the Student Research Committee for approval. Proposals should include an abstract, project timeline, budget, and any funding requests. For registration in the fall semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than April 20 and for registration in the spring semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than Nov. 20. Once approved, registration is through the student's departmental chair. Students, mentors and committee members will meet throughout the semester, with student presentations at the end of the semester.

    Contact hours dependent on the number of credits registered for this course
    1-3 credits

Animal Science

  
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    AS 1000 - Survey of Animal Agriculture


    Animal Science students, matriculating from approved high school Vo-Ag programs, may receive 3 elective credits at the end of their freshman year at Delaware Valley College. Contact the Animal Science Department for application procedures.

    3 credits
  
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    AS 1006 - Introduction to Animal Science


    This course examines the management and production practices for dairy, beef, horses, sheep, swine, and poultry. The associated laboratories acquaint the student with working procedures in common practice.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    AS 1045 - Livestock Industries and Careers


    This course emphasizes the variety of production systems and careers in the beef cattle, sheep, swine, poultry, and horse industries, providing the basis for the student's selection of production courses in the senior year.

    2 hours Lecture
    2 credits
  
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    AS 1101 - Stable Management


    An introductory level course that emphasizes the management and practical care of equine facilities and horses. Requires participation outside of scheduled class hours.

    3 hours Lecture and 2 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    AS 2116 - Livestock Evaluation


    This course emphasizes the factors that contribute to livestock utility. The relationship between the live animal and the carcass is covered as well as an introduction to livestock judging and oral reason presentation. The various systems of production, testing and grading are also studied.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    AS 2117 - Animal Welfare


    Animal Welfare

    3 Hour Lecture
    3
  
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    AS 2120 - Organic Livestock Management


    TBA

    Offered Fall

    3 Credits
  
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    AS 2219 - Horse Breeding Management


    A course designed to acquaint the student with the operation of a horse breeding farm. Teasing, breeding, foaling, mare and stallion care, and foal care are emphasized. Students manage the College's breeding facility. Requires participation outside of scheduled class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 1101 - Stable Management .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    AS 3000 - Selected Topics I


    Special projects designed to meet individual needs of students in the specialized fields of agriculture. Projects will be arranged on a one-to-one basis with a department faculty member and with the approval of the Department Chairperson. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 credits.

    3 hrs of student/faculty instruction per week
    1 credit
  
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    AS 3020 - Animals and Society


    This course covers different species of animals
    and their uses in society. History of breeds,
    nutrition, health concerns, husbandry, uses of
    large and small animals in society and
    social/legal issues regarding animals will be
    discussed. 3 hours lecture. 

    Prereq/Corequisite Take EN-1101, EN-1201, and have at least Junior status.

    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    AS 3123 - Animal Husbandry Techniques


    The course presents an overview of the techniques associated with handling, restraint, injections, and identification of livestock. Additional management techniques are performed on college livestock as livestock production schedules require.

    1 hour Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    2 credits
  
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    AS 3150 - Alternative Agricultural Animal Production


    This course acquaints students with alternative agricultural animals that are raised for meat, fiber, leather and/or companionship. Students study the behaviors and uses of these animals as well as general anatomy and physiology, nutrition, medical care and related routine husbandry practices, with comparisons made to similar domestic animals. Animals to be discussed will include camelids, ratites, cervids, game birds, and bison as well as unusual breeds and types of domestic animals such as sheep, cattle, swine, goats and equids.

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    AS 3209 - Advanced Selection of Livestock


    This course is designed to instruct the student in the comprehensive judging and selection of livestock, as well as live animal pricing and grading. The student will also receive an in-depth study of reasons, preparation and presentation.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 2116 - Livestock Evaluation  or Permission of Instructor.

    3 hours Laboratory
    1 credit
  
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    AS 3210 - Mare and Foal Management


    An advanced course involving the care and management of breeding, pregnant and foaling mares. Care of newborn foals during the first few weeks of life is emphasized. Required management participation involves time commitments in addition to regularly scheduled class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 2219 - Horse Breeding Management . Restricted to Equine Science and Management Specialization.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    AS 4000 - Selected Topics II


    Special projects designed to meet individual needs of students in the specialized fields of agriculture. Projects will be arranged on a one-to-one basis with a department faculty member and with the approval of the Department Chairperson. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 credits.

    3 hrs of student/faculty instruction per week
    1 credit
  
  
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    AS 4016 - Animal Science Seminar


    The study of recent research and development in the field of Animal Science with special emphasis on oral presentations.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior staus required, LA 2005 - Speech .

    1 hour of Lecture and Discussion
    1 credit
  
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    AS 4027 - Small Ruminant Science


    This is a comprehensive introduction to the feeding, breeding, housing, care and management of sheep. While the lectures focus on current practices employed in both large and small operations, the laboratories offer opportunities to apply management practices and to visit a variety of commercial operations in the area. Requires participation outside of scheduled class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): DS 3010 - Animal Feeding and Nutrition  and DS 3029 - Dairy and Livestock Genetics .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    AS 4028 - Swine Science


    This course provides a thorough introduction to all aspects of swine production and management. The lectures cover current practices regarding nutrition, breeding, housing, and health care, while laboratories provide opportunities to apply management techniques. Requires participation outside of scheduled class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): DS 3029 - Dairy and Livestock Genetics  and DS 3010 - Animal Feeding and Nutrition .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    AS 4029 - Poultry Science


    This course is a broad study covering the breeds and varieties of poultry used commercially for meat and eggs. It includes the production methods, management practices, marketing procedures, processing systems and techniques commonly current in the poultry industry. Requires participation outside of scheduled class hours.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    AS 4030 - Advanced Poultry and Avian Science


    Advanced Poultry and Avian Science

    3 Hours Lecture
    2
  
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    AS 4030L - Advanced Poultry and Avian Science Lab


    Advanced Poultry and Avian Science Lab

    3 Hours Lab
    0
  
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    AS 4041 - Senior Research


    This course is designed for students of all majors who are of sophomore status and above with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 and who have a serious desire and potential to undertake a research project. After obtaining the approval of a faculty mentor, students intending to register for student research will need to submit a 1-2 page proposal to the Student Research Committee for approval. Proposals should include an abstract, project timeline, budget, and any fund- ing requests. For registration in the fall semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than April 20 and for registration in the spring semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than Nov. 20. Once approved, registration is through the student's departmental chair. Students, mentors and committee members will meet throughout the semester, with student presentations at the end of the semester. Contact hours dependent on number of credits registered for this course - 1-3 credits 

    1-3 Credits
  
  •  

    AS 4051 - Current Topics


    This is a research and discussion course that emphasizes topics of current interest to the animal and dairy industries. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 credits.

    1 hour Lecture and Discussion
    1 credit
  
  •  

    AS 4106 - Principles of Animal Nutrition


    A study of the principles and fundamentals of nutrition in livestock. Emphasis is placed on comparative relationships of good nutrients to metabolic processes in domestic animals and on current research and development in the field of animal nutrition.

    Prerequisite(s): CH 2003 - Principles of Organic Chemistry  or CH 2120 - Organic Chemistry I  or Permission of Instructor.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
  •  

    AS 4111 - Yearling Horse Sale Management


    An advanced course involving the management of yearling horses including sales preparation, development of a consignment, sales advertising, videotaping sales horses, and working a yearling sale.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 2219 - Horse Breeding Management . Restricted to Equine Science & Management specialization. Requires participation outside of scheduled class hours

    2 credits
  
  •  

    AS 4130 - Advanced Livestock Judging


    This course provides intensive training in selection of livestock using subjective and objective measurements as well as the use of oral reasons to explain and defend decisions. An intercollegiate Livestock Judging Team will be selected from students taking this course. Due to considerable travel and time required, enrollment is limited and a 2.2 academic average is required. This course begins one week prior to the start of the fall semester.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 3209 - Advanced Selection of Livestock .

    3 hours Laboratory
    1 credit
  
  
  •  

    AS 4250 - Stallion Management


    An upper division course for persons interested in the management of stallions. Emphasis is placed on management of stallions in commercial breeding situations involving semen collection and the shipment of cooled semen. Three hours per week of discussion and practicum. Practicum involves collection, evaluation, and shipment of semen.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 2219 - Horse Breeding Management . Restricted to Equine Science and Management Specialization. Requires participation outside of scheduled class hours.

    3 hours Lecture and Participation
    3 credits
  
  •  

    AS 4316 - Management and Care of the Equine Neonate


    An advanced course involving routine care and management of the newborn foal during the first year of life including diseases affecting the neonate, nutrition and feeding of the growing horse, vaccination and deworming programs as well as management of high-risk foals, orphan foals and high-risk dams.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 2219 - Horse Breeding Management . Restricted to Equine Science and Management specialization. Requires participation outside of scheduled class hours.

    2 hours Lecture
    2 credits
  
  •  

    AS 5000 - Hartpury Exchange


    A semester exchange with the Hartpury College in Gloucestershire, Great Britain for qualified students in the Animal Science program. Students pursue coursework in Animal Science and Livestock Production from the British perspective. Spring semester of junior year.

    Prerequisite(s): minimum of a 3.0 GPA and permission of the Animal Science Department Chairperson.

  
  •  

    SA 3016 - Junior Seminar


    Junior Seminar

    1 Credit
  
  •  

    SA 3217 - Polymerase Chain Reaction


    Polymerase Chain Reaction

    1 Hour Leture
    2
  
  •  

    SA 3217L - Polymerase Chain Reaction Lab


    Polymerase Chain Reaction Lab

    3 Hour Lab
    0
  
  •  

    SA 4041 - Student Research


    Student Research

    1 Hour LEcture
    1
  
  •  

    SA 4226 - Wildlife Law and Policy


    Wildlife Law and Policy

    3 Hour Lecture
    3
  
  •  

    SR 4041 - Student Research


    This course is designed for students of all majors who are of sophomore status and above with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 and who have a serious desire and potential to undertake a research project. After obtaining the approval of a faculty mentor, students intending to register for student research will need to submit a 1-2 page proposal to the Student Research Committee for approval. Proposals should include an abstract, project timeline, budget, and any funding requests. For registration in the fall semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than April 20 and for registration in the spring semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than Nov. 20. Once approved, registration is through the student's departmental chair. Students, mentors and committee members will meet throughout the semester, with student presentations at the end of the semester.

    Contact hours dependent on number of credits registered for this course
    1-3 credits

Biology

  
  •  

    BY 1113 - Biology I


    An introduction to Biology. These two courses emphasize the organization, structure and basic principles governing the lives of all organisms at the molecular, cellular, tissue and organ system, organism and population levels. The courses are a continuum and are to be taken in sequence. Biology II continues with organismal diversity organ systems of animals and plants, nervous and circulatory systems, reproduction, development, behavior and ecology. The laboratory involves a dynamic study of these principles with the use of living materials as much as is feasible. Biology I is a prerequisite for BY 1214 - Biology II . This is the introductory biology sequence required for biology majors.

    3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory
    4 credits
  
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    BY 1115 - Natural Science I


    Natural Science I introduces some of the basic physical and chemical principles that affect our world and then concentrates on the biological principles that pertain to living things in general and human beings in particular. The concepts build from the cellular level to the systems level and then to the organism as a whole. Natural Science II is a continuation of Natural Science I and begins with a study of basic ecological concepts. It builds to an examination of the roles humans have played in creating some of the problems we face today as well as the roles we may play to help alleviate them. Topics include population growth, energy sources, and air, water, solid waste, and toxic waste pollution. Natural Science I (or permission of the Department Chairperson) is a prerequisite for BY 1216 - Natural Science II . Not available to biology majors and does not substitute for an introductory biology course.

    3 hours Lecture each
    3 credits
  
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    BY 1116 - Biological Science I


    An introduction to the study of life featuring: molecular and cellular biology; genetics; metabolism; survey of the animal kingdom; animal organ systems and embryology; survey of the botanical kingdoms; seed plant structure, function, and development; behavior; evolution; and ecology. Biological Science I is a prerequisite for BY 1217 - Biological Science II . This is the introductory biology sequence for majors other than Biology majors. Permission of the department chairperson is required for biology majors.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory each
    3 credits
  
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    BY 1214 - Biology II


    An introduction to Biology. These two courses emphasize the organization, structure and basic principles governing the lives of all organisms at the molecular, cellular, tissue and organ system, organism and population levels. The courses are a continuum and are to be taken in sequence. Biology II continues with organismal diversity organ systems of animals and plants, nervous and circulatory systems, reproduction, development, behavior and ecology. The laboratory involves a dynamic study of these principles with the use of living materials as much as is feasible. BY 1113 - Biology I  is a prerequisite for Biology II. This is the introductory biology sequence required for biology majors. 

    Prerequisite(s):   or  

    3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory
    4 credits
  
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    BY 1216 - Natural Science II


    Natural Science I introduces some of the basic physical and chemical principles that affect our world and then concentrates on the biological principles that pertain to living things in general and human beings in particular. The concepts build from the cellular level to the systems level and then to the organism as a whole. Natural Science II is a continuation of Natural Science I and begins with a study of basic ecological concepts. It builds to an examination of the roles humans have played in creating some of the problems we face today as well as the roles we may play to help alleviate them. Topics include population growth, energy sources, and air, water, solid waste, and toxic waste pollution. BY 1115 - Natural Science I  (or permission of the Department Chairperson) is a prerequisite for Natural Science II. Not available to biology majors and does not substitute for an introductory biology course.

    Prerequisite(s):  

     

    3 hours Lecture each
    3 credits

  
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    BY 1217 - Biological Science II


    An introduction to the study of life featuring: molecular and cellular biology; genetics; metabolism; survey of the animal kingdom; animal organ systems and embryology; survey of the botanical kingdoms; seed plant structure, function, and development; behavior; evolution; and ecology. BY 1116 - Biological Science I  is a prerequisite for Biological Science II. This is the introductory biology sequence for majors other than Biology majors. Permission of the department chairperson is required for biology majors.

    Prerequisite(s):   or  

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory each
    3 credits
  
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    BY 2001 - Botany


    Plant structure, function, and development are studied in this course, followed by a survey of the botanical kingdoms, stressing reproductive cycles and evolution. Laboratory slides and specimens are complemented by field work.

    Prerequisite(s): BY 1214 - Biology II  or BY 1217 - Biological Science II .

    3 hours Lecture and 3 hour Laboratory
    4 credits
  
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    BY 2003 - Genetics


    This course includes a study of Mendelian principles, population genetics, and the modern molecular concepts of the gene and its action. An emphasis is placed upon relating modern developments in this science to basic principles as well as applying those principles in the analysis of genetic data derived from selective breeding experiments, pedigree analyses, population studies, and studies of the molecular system that stores, transmits, and translates inherited information.

    Prerequisite(s): BY 1113 - Biology I  or BY 1116 - Biological Science I .

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    BY 2004 - Genetics Laboratory


    An introduction to classical and current molecular genetics techniques for studying reproduction and inheritance patterns in living organisms. Designed to provide the "hands-on" experience to facilitate understanding of genetic phenomena. The format is flexible to allow adequate time for the needs of the organisms and procedures. Required of biology majors. Can be scheduled anytime concurrent with or after passing Genetics.

    3 hours Laboratory
    1 credit
  
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    BY 2010 - Introduction to Aquaculture


    An introduction to the science of aquaculture. The course reviews the history of the science and examines both warm and cold water species. Different rearing systems are studied for the various species. Production, nutrition, diseases, and marketing are also examined.

    Prerequisite(s): high school biology and chemistry required, Introductory College Biology and Chemistry preferred.

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    BY 2108 - Ecology


    A study of the characteristics of populations and how populations of different organisms are integrated to form natural communities. Emphasis is placed on freshwater and terrestrial ecology. The laboratory is concerned with methods used to collect and evaluate ecological data.

    Prerequisite(s): BY 1214 - Biology II  or BY 1217 - Biological Science II .

    3 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    4 credits
  
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    BY 2223 - Comparative Anatomy


    This course presents a comparative study of the structure and evolution of vertebrate organ systems. The laboratory involves a detailed anatomical study of the lamprey, shark, perch, necturus, frog, turtle, pigeon, and cat.

    Prerequisite(s): BY 1214 - Biology II  or BY 1217 - Biological Science II .

    3 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    4 credits
  
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    BY 2235 - Plant Communities


    A study of the components, structure, integration, interactions, habitats and requirements of native plant communities with emphasis on those of the Mid-Atlantic region. Laboratory includes identification and vegetation analysis of local plant communities.

    Prerequisite(s):   or  

    Offered Offered in the Spring Semester of odd-numbered years.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    BY 2238 - Evolution


    Evolution is the unifying concept of biology. Evolutionary biologists approach the field from two primary perspectives and this course intends to familiarize you with both. One perspective focuses on the process of evolution. Evolutionary biologists with this perspective ask the question of how evolution works. Evolution operates at all scales of biology from molecules to the global biosphere. To understand how genes evolve is not enough to explain how specialization happens or why mass extinctions occur. The study of process focuses us to examine evolutionary mechanisms at all scales of biology. The second perspective focuses on the patterns of evolution. The diversity of life on Earth today is the product of evolutionary history. To understand how we arrived at the diversity observable today, we need to understand what actually happened as evolutionary processes shaped the history of life. This is evolutionary pattern. We will discuss how we reconstruct that history and how e that history can be used to address biological questions that we face in a modern world. The lectures in this course will allow you to develop a deeper understanding of this uniquely important field of biology. But, perhaps more importantly, the class activities will help you develop and refine those skills necessary to becoming an effective scientists, regardless of your interests. You will digest literature, organize discussions, and prepare and deliver presentations. These skills, far more than you ability to memorize the details of our lectures, will prove valuable regardless of your career trajectory.  

    Prerequisite(s): BY 1116   &  BY 1217   Co-requisite: BY-2238L

    3 Hours Lecture, 3 Hours Lab
    4
  
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    BY 2240 - Ornithology


    A review of the biology of birds, including their evolutionary history, anatomy, physiology, and, especially, their behavior. Special attention will be paid to the plight of endangered species and related conservation measures. Students will learn to identify many of the common bird species of eastern North America through slides and frequent bird walks on or near the campus. There will be up to two Saturday field trips. In addition to the textbook and field guide, binoculars will be required.

    Prerequisite(s):   or   

     

    2 hours Lecture
    3 credits

  
  
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    BY 3007 - Entomology


    An introduction to the study of insects, focusing on their uniqueness and importance to the terrestrial biosphere. Topics include systematics, morphology, physiology, and ecology with an emphasis on adaptation. The laboratory work includes the creation of a collection of locally occurring insects and their relatives.

    Prerequisite(s): BY 1113 - Biology I  or BY 1116 - Biological Science I .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 Credits
  
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    BY 3008 - Introduction to Earth and Space Science


    This course develops an appreciation and understanding of the scope and organization of the solar system, Milky Way galaxy and the Universe. The study includes geological, oceanic and meteorological phenomena that continue to shape the planet Earth and maintain it as a habitat for life.

    Prerequisite(s): CH 1203 - General Chemistry II  and BY 1214 - Biology II  or BY 1217 - Biological Science II .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    BY 3105 - Introduction to the Biology and Ecology of Algae


    This course investigates the classification, physiology and ecology of the major algal groups. It includes practical experience with isolation of specimens from their natural habitats, culture, identification, and microscopic examination.

    Prerequisite(s): BY 2001 - Botany .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
 

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