Jul 12, 2020  
2016-2017 Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Food Science, Nutrition, and Management

  
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    FS 4212 - Refined Foods and Food Ingredients


    Food ingredients derived from plant materials and food products manufactured from those ingredients are the topics of this course. Starches and sweeteners, fats and oils, spices, as well as the manufacture of snack foods, confections, baked products, and nonalcoholic beverages will be discussed.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    FS 4213 - Introduction to Brewing Science


    This course introduces the student to the basic methods of producing a malt beverage and the factors which influence beverage quality.

    Prerequisite(s): Age 21 and senior status.

    2 hours Laboratory and Discussion
    1 credit
  
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    FS 4222 - Quantity Food Production


    In this course, the student is introduced to the principles and practices of production management. Students perform all aspects of meals, including planning, ordering, preparing and presenting. Quality control is stressed.

    Prerequisite(s): FS 1205 - Principles of Professional Cooking .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    FS 4223 - Seminar (Food Science)


    A review and discussion of the literature concerned with advancements in the food industry are features in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of instructor.

    1 hour Lecture and Discussion
    1 credit
  
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    FS 4224 - Food Product Development


    Criteria considered in the development and production of a food product are the topics of this course. The format of the course is designed to draw upon and expand by application material from the Food Science areas of chemistry, nutrition, microbiology, statistics, and engineering. Sensory evaluation, packaging, and engineering economics will also be introduced.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior status in Food Science or Food Technology specializations or permission of instructor.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    FS 4228 - Meat and Meat Products


    A study of slaughtering, post mortem handling, meat fabrication, and further process and package systems. The microstructure and microbiology of meats is covered in conjunction with meat inspection, safety systems and quality evaluation.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    FS 4229 - Foodservice Marketing Strategy


    This course takes the traditional marketing concepts and applies them directly to the restaurant and foodservice industry. Current trends and consumer behavior are discussed along with the importance of menu design and pricing, advertising, and promotions.

    Prerequisite(s): BA 2017 - Principles of Marketing  or permission of Instructor.

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    FS 4232 - Legal Aspects of Foodservice Management


    This course is designed to help food service managers and owners prevent legal problems, or minimize the harmful effects of legal situations. Federal, state, and local laws and regulations are discussed on topics including liability, patron civil rights, employee relation, contracts, and security. How to choose and work with an attorney will also be discussed.

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    SR 4041 - Student Research


    This course is designed for students of all majors who are of sophomore status and above with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 and who have a serious desire and potential to undertake a research project. After obtaining the approval of a faculty mentor, students intending to register for Student Research will need to submit a 1-2 page proposal to the Student Research Committee for approval. Proposals should include an abstract, project timeline, budget, and any funding requests. For registration in the fall semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than April 20 and for registration in the spring semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than Nov. 20. Once approved, registration is through the student’s departmental chair. Students, mentors and committee members will meet throughout the semester, with student presentations at the end of the semester.

    Contact hours dependent on number of credits registered for this course
    1-3 credits

Graduate Education

  
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    EDU 8005 - Educational Leadership and Change Theory


    This course focuses on organizational and leadership theories as they relate to K-12 and higher education institutions. The course will also reference the impact of diversity, culture, and change on educational institutions. Through linking theory to practice, future leaders will be empowered to make decisions utilizing data, plan strategically, and engage stakeholders in comprehensive strategic planning.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8010 - Using & Integrating Learning Techniques


    This course is designed to ensure that future educational leaders will have strong knowledge and use of current and emerging technologies to assist with the teaching and learning process and to facilitate the management of complex organizations. Students will demonstrate strategies for using and implementing multimedia, hypermedia, and electronic networking to implement in their own school settings.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8012 - Planning & Managing Financial Resources


    This course is designed to prepare educational leaders to understand and prepare a system-wide budget plan that allocates resources aligned with the system’s needs. Topics include budget planning related to facilities management, curriculum, and personnel as well as school finance issues related to capital projects, borrowing, and debt. Additional topics include strategic planning approaches, building assessment, energy, and community development.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8013 - Plan and Manage Fin Res for H.E.


    This course is designed to prepare educational leaders to understand and prepare a system-wide budget plan that allocates resources aligned with the system’s needs. Topics include budget planning related to facilities management, curriculum, and personnel as well as school finance issues related to capital projects, borrowing, and debt. Additional topics include strategic planning approaches, building assessment, energy, and community development.


    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    EDU 8015 - Introduction to Educational Research


    This course focuses on major methods and techniques of educational research and provides students with the knowledge and skills for the critical evaluation of research. Students will become familiar with the dissertation format and begin the process to outline possible research topics and design methodologies.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8023 - Qualitative Research Methods


    This course focuses on the major methods and techniques of educational research and provides the skills for the critical evaluation of educational research. There is an emphasis on qualitative research focusing on designs and methodologies, theoretical and interpretive frameworks, ethical considerations, standards of validation, and introductory data collection, analysis, and reporting. Students will design a sample project incorporating qualitative research methodologies.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8025 - Research Methods


    This course will study educational research methodology.

    3 Credits
  
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    EDU 8026 - Quantitative Research Methods


    This course will study educational research methodology from the more quantitative viewpoint with an emphasis on univariate and multivariate analyses, correlational studies, multiple regression analysis, analysis of covariance and various factorial analysis designs. Focus will be placed on understanding these approaches and how to implement them for individual research questions. Students will design a sample project incorporating quantitative research methodologies.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8030 - Legal and Ethical Leadership


    This course focuses on the most current laws at both the state and federal levels and their impact on the operation of educational institutions for leaders. Both state and federal statutes will be examined with a focus on accurate analysis and interpretation of the law through case reviews. Law, legislation, and court decisions that may impact the rights and responsibilities of faculty, students, and parents will be studied and analyzed. The course is structured to assist educational leaders in acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to ensure that the management of their educational institution through adherence to the law produces a safe, efficient and effective learning environment for all students, while consistently advocating for children and maintaining professional integrity.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8035 - Leadership, Diversity & Societal Change


    This course studies the impact of diversity, culture, ethnic origin and societal change on educational institutions and the emerging leadership styles resulting from these factors. Leaders will be prepared to meet the challenges of cultural diversity and rapid societal change in organizations. There is a focus on how language, gender, race, tradition, education, economic structure and global events interact with organizational philosophy to create behavioral norms at all levels. The influence of all of these factors on leader’s behavior will be studied.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8042 - Practicum & Field Exp Hi-Ed I


    This course will prepare future leaders in higher education for complex situations and specialized functions that are performed as part of system-wide oversight in the administrative offices office. Students will explore the political forces that influence and shape decision-making processes, reform efforts, and community relations. This course requires a student to complete an internship with a minimum of 360 hours as a superintendent/higher education intern supervised by a certified school superintendent or the equivalent in higher education. The student will complete and present a leadership portfolio that shows evidence of strategic planning, use of data to inform decision-making, and the potential for substantial improvement in teaching and learning. This course will span three semesters in order to give students a full perspective of the calendar year.


    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    EDU 8043 - Superintendent/Higher Ed. Practicum and Field Experience I


    This course will prepare future school district leaders and leaders in higher education for complex situations and specialized functions that are performed as part of system-wide oversight in the administrative offices office. Students will explore the political forces that influence and shape decision-making processes, reform efforts, and community relations. This course requires a student to complete an internship with a minimum of 360 hours as a superintendent/higher education intern supervised by a certified school superintendent or the equivalent in higher education. The student will complete and present a leadership portfolio that shows evidence of strategic planning, use of data to inform decision-making, and the potential for substantial improvement in teaching and learning. This course will span three semesters in order to give students a full perspective of the calendar year.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8045 - Practicum & Field Exp Hi-Ed II


    This course will prepare future leaders in higher education for complex situations and specialized functions that are performed as part of system-wide oversight in the administrative offices office. Students will explore the political forces that influence and shape decision-making processes, reform efforts, and community relations. This course requires a student to complete an internship with a minimum of 360 hours as a superintendent/higher education intern supervised by a certified school superintendent or the equivalent in higher education. The student will complete and present a leadership portfolio that shows evidence of strategic planning, use of data to inform decision-making, and the potential for substantial improvement in teaching and learning. This course will span three semesters in order to give students a full perspective of the calendar year.


    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    EDU 8046 - Superintendent/Higher Ed. Practicum and Field Experience II


    This course will prepare future school district leaders and leaders in higher education for complex situations and specialized functions that are performed as part of system-wide oversight in the administrative offices office. Students will explore the political forces that influence and shape decision-making processes, reform efforts, and community relations. This course requires a student to complete an internship with a minimum of 360 hours as a superintendent/higher education intern supervised by a certified school superintendent or the equivalent in higher education. The student will complete and present a leadership portfolio that shows evidence of strategic planning, use of data to inform decision-making, and the potential for substantial improvement in teaching and learning. This course will span three semesters in order to give students a full perspective of the calendar year.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8047 - Contemporary Topics in Higher Education


    Course Description: This course explores theories, policies and approaches for conducting purposeful negotiations and resolving conflicts. The context includes legislation, legal issues, and alternatives to litigation. Current research findings are integrated with support for various approaches in conflict resolution.

    3 Credits
  
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    EDU 8048 - Practicum & Field Exp Hi E III


    This course will prepare future leaders in higher education for complex situations and specialized functions that are performed as part of system-wide oversight in the administrative offices office. Students will explore the political forces that influence and shape decision-making processes, reform efforts, and community relations. This course requires a student to complete an internship with a minimum of 360 hours as a superintendent/higher education intern supervised by a certified school superintendent or the equivalent in higher education. The student will complete and present a leadership portfolio that shows evidence of strategic planning, use of data to inform decision-making, and the potential for substantial improvement in teaching and learning. This course will span three semesters in order to give students a full perspective of the calendar year.


    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    EDU 8049 - Superintendent/Higher Ed. Practicum and Field Experience III


    This course will prepare future school district leaders and leaders in higher education for complex situations and specialized functions that are performed as part of system-wide oversight in the administrative offices office. Students will explore the political forces that influence and shape decision-making processes, reform efforts, and community relations. This course requires a student to complete an internship with a minimum of 360 hours as a superintendent/higher education intern supervised by a certified school superintendent or the equivalent in higher education. The student will complete and present a leadership portfolio that shows evidence of strategic planning, use of data to inform decision-making, and the potential for substantial improvement in teaching and learning. This course will span three semesters in order to give students a full perspective of the calendar year.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8051 - Professional Development and Supervision


    This course examines the components of educational leadership that relate to the supervising process and professional growth. Both theory and practice are emphasized. The clinical supervision model is highlighted along with the model of supervision as mandated by ACT82. Best practices in staff development are discussed and students will engage in ways to design, implement and evaluate staff development programs, manage resources and create a culture of teaching and learning with an emphasis on learning.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8053 - School and Community Partnerships and Public Relations


    This course is designed to assist future leaders with communication skills in the context of large, complex systems and personal one-on-one or small groups, successful strategies for responding to the politics associated with schools and navigating the waters of elected boards are discussed and simulated through role play and case studies. Students will study concepts of public relations and develop a site-based plan to promote and event, activity, or concept and solicit feedback for evaluation.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8054 - Program Design, Evaluation & Development


    This course is designed to assist practicing school leaders to implement, analyze and monitor the various processes and components of a comprehensive curriculum, instruction and assessment system in a school district. Current methods of curriculum and program design, development, and evaluation will be studied. Implications for supporting and sustaining high quality instruction and learning will be addressed through the relationships and importance of coherence among curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This course will introduce students to the tools and resources available to fully analyze and utilize data-driven decision-making. The role of structures for school improvement will be examined, including standards-based reform, professional learning communities, supervision and professional development and communication. Students will develop and submit an applied research project in the form of an Action Plan for School Improvement based on the current research and evidence of best practices.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8056 - Leading Comprehensive Student Support Services


    This course prepares students for district-wide responsibilities related to the coordination of the various functions included in pupil personnel services. Emphasis is placed on the management and supervision of school counseling, child accounting, health services, school psychology and special education within a school district. The responsibilities for coordinating student services within a school district are outlined and studied, including, but not limited to, over-representation of diverse learning in special education, prevention and early intervention, and effective instructional strategies for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. Program and staff development functions as well as curricular and administrative duties of the student services department are highlighted. Policies and procedures related to the delivery of pupil services as related to community, state, federal and local social agencies are examined.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8057 - Negotiations & Conflict Resolution


    This course explores theories, policies and approaches for conducting purposeful negotiations and resolving conflicts in the educational arena. The context includes legislation, legal issues, and alternatives to litigation. Students will learn about the use of resource management, including labor laws, labor negotiation protocols, recruitment, personnel assistance and development, and evaluation procedures. Current research findings are integrated with support for various approaches in conflict resolution.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8059 - Educational Policy, Politics & Current Issues


    This course will examine the current issues in education policy. Students explore the role of participants and the procedures used in the development of public policies effecting educational organizations. The content focuses on the complex political, societal, economic, and global issues that impact schools and districts. Students will study issues including diversity, federal accountability, legislation, inclusion, unions, gender equity, social justice, and equal opportunity.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8061 - Economic Development of Higher Education Organizations


    This course explores the application of economic principles to the study of policy and to the solution of economic problems in complex organizations. Included are discussions of major economic theories and their relationship to leadership decision making in the corporate, not for profit, and public policy arenas. This course is designed to identify and analyze factors that contribute to the successful economic development of organizations. Topics will include risk assessment and management, leadership skills, sources of funding and successful economic policies. Case studies of both successful and unsuccessful economic development will be analyzed.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8063 - Philanthropy & Resource Development in Higher Education


    This course will study the historical, economic, political, social, and psychological foundations of philanthropy in our society as well as the ethical, legal, and financial aspects of organizational resource development. The role of leadership strategies for acquisition, maintenance, and stewardship of resources will be explored. Students will review successful fund raising campaigns and develop a prototype fund raising campaign.

  
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    EDU 8064 - Innovation & Entrepreneurship in Higher Education


    This course will introduce students to the role institutions of higher ed play in fostering innovative discoveries. A focus will be applied to financial, budgetary and economic development practices as they pertain to institutions of higher education. Students will develop skills and knowledge to recognize effective leadership in a dynamic, ever-changing higher education environment.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8066 - Student Services & Co-Curricular Activities in Higher Education


    This course examines the comprehensive nature of student issues as a vital component in the evolving learner-centered environments of higher education. Theory and practice are used to guide the discussion, investigate the issues, and generate solutions. Students investigate and seek potential solutions to authentic problems facing leaders in student affairs such as enrollment management, diversity, safety, student induction, advising and counseling, placement testing, career development, residential life, health services, student activities, etc.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8067 - Faculty and Academic Governance in Higher Education


    The purpose of this course is to provide an intensive introduction to the organization and governance of colleges and universities. It is designed to familiarize students with the faculty, academic and administrative contexts and organizational cultures within which they may be employed. Theoretical underpinnings of organizational behavior relating to individuals and groups and organizational theory relating to the organization itself will be studied.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8069 - Policy Development and Analysis in Higher Education


    This course will examine current issues of higher education and analyze future trends. Various approaches to policy development and their applications are studied from institutional, state, federal, legislative, and international perspectives. Students will refine their knowledge and skills needed to plan and execute sound and innovative approaches to advance the institution’s mission to key publics.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8090 - Dissertation Preparation


    This seminar will provide doctoral students with information on the dissertation process and proposal format and enable them to develop and refine ideas for potential research. This course will assist students with topic development and offer consideration for qualitative/quantitative methodologies.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8092 - Dissertation Design I


    This seminar will provide doctoral students with information and guidance on the dissertation process and proposal format in order to guide the development of chapters one and three of the dissertation.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8094 - Dissertation Design II


    This seminar will provide doctoral students with information and guidance on the dissertation process and proposal format in order to guide the development of chapter two of the dissertation.


    3 Hours LEcture
    3
  
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    EDU 8096 - Dissertation Data Analysis


    This seminar will provide doctoral students with information and guidance required to analyze, interpret and format research data as part of the dissertation process.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8098 - Dissertation Maintenance Seminar


    Students requiring additional time to complete the dissertation may register for billable/zero credit seminars as necessary.

    3 credits
  
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    EDU 8099 - Dissertation Defense


    Dissertation Defense


    3 Hours Lecture
    0
  
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    GE 641 - Bullying & Social Networking


    Bullying & Social Networking

    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6005 - Connecting Students Career Goals WithyCore Subjects: Technology Education


    This course is designed for master level teachers K-12. It is mean to support continuing education for teachers who are interested in learning how to incorporate Technology Education topics in the courses they teach in order for their students to learn how to apply tools, materials, processes, and systems to solve problems and provide benefits as a contributing member of society. Teachers will demonstrate knowledge of content, process and skills to provide students with a holistic approach to learning and to offer unique opportunities to apply numerous academic concepts through practical, hands-on applications.

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6006 - Connecting Students Career Goals WithyCore Subjects: Communications


    This course is designed for master level teachers K-12. It is mean to support continuing education for teachers who are interested in learning how to incorporate communication skills in the courses they teach in so K-12 students can practically apply these skills in their future professions and/or everyday life. Communications is a diverse area of study with many applicable skills. These skills give teachers several options and connect students and their career goals.

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6007 - Creating a Brain Compatible ClassroomyDifferently


    This course will explore the ways brains work with regard to learning. 

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6008 - Connecting Student Career Goals WithyCore Subjects: Civics and Government


    This course is designed for K-12 master level teachers. It is meant to support graduate education for teachers who are interested in learning how to incorporate Civics and Government topics into the courses they teach. 

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6009 - Connecting Students Career GoalsyWith Core Subjects: Arts & Humanities


    This course is designed to support continuing education for teachers who are interested in learning how to incorporate real-world arts and humanities themes in the courses they teach in order for their students to learn how to practically apply these skills in their future professions and/or everyday life. Students will demonstrate an understanding of various aspects of arts and humanities in accordance with weekly topics on how arts and humanities content supports core standards.

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6010 - Introduction to Research


    Introduction to Research

    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6011 - Connecting Students Career GoalsyWith Core Subjects: Mathematics


    This course is designed to support continuing education for teachers who are interested in learning how to incorporate real-world mathematical skills in the courses they teach in order for their students to learn how to practically apply these skills in their future professions and/or everyday life. Students will demonstrate an understanding of various aspects of mathematics in accordance with weekly topics on how mathematical content supports core standards.

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6012 - Creating Meaningful Experiences toyAchieve Classroom Success


    This course will show educators how to design compelling learning activities that engage students in their own learning by helping them develop practical life skills as well as critical thinking skills. Teachers will learn to apply the SCORE model which has five sets of specific criteria that are characteristic of highly effective, brain-compatible activities. These criteria will be used to analyze the activities in which they participate as well as those they plan, ensuring that each includes relevant life skills, meets curriculum requirements, addresses organizational issues, plans ahead for desired results, and assesses effectiveness. Teachers will learn how to infuse lessons from the entire learning process - introductory, informational, practice, review and culminating - with the kind of highly active learning that transforms both student and subject matter.

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6013 - Differentiated Instruction


    This course will provide educators with the essential knowledge and skills to implement differentiated instruction (DI) successfully in their own classrooms. DI, a widely respected, research-based instructional approach, provides teachers with effective, manageable strategies for meeting the needs of an increasingly diverse student population within the context of today’s challenging standards based curriculum. Teachers will gain expertise in understanding and implementing a broad range of strategies associated with three essential, distinguishing components of differentiated instruction. First, the teacher’s role as guide and facilitator in a classroom environment specifically designed to support self-directed student learning and student teacher collaboration. Second, the interdependent nature of flexible grouping and assessment in a DI classroom. Third, the adaptation of curriculum content, processes and products to provide students with entry points to learning that match their readiness, interests and/or learning profiles.

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6014 - Cooperative Learning in the Classroom


    This course will help educators teach students to work effectively in groups to achieve subject-matter mastery and develop interpersonal skills. In-class activities are paired with site-based action research to provide teachers with the opportunity first to observe and experience these strategies as learners, then to use their insight and expertise as they apply these strategies in their own classrooms and subject-matter areas. Teachers will be equipped to guide their students not only to academic success in the short term, but also to long-term success through the development of the critical skills: collaborative problem-solving, teamwork, self-evaluation, effective communication, and shared decision making.

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6015 - Introduction to Statistical Data and Research


    This course is a comprehensive approach for students needing to conduct qualitative or quantitative research. The course will focus on the practical problems encountered in research beginning with the formulation of the research question and continuing through the preparation of the final research document. This course is designed to examine the theories, techniques, and methodologies of research currently employed for the analysis of educational and social sciences initiatives and investigations. Emphasis will be placed on applying knowledge of research techniques and methodologies to the critical analysis of published research. Students will be exposed to research methodologies as they investigate various statistical designs and test measurements.

    3 credits
  
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    GE 6016 - Why and How Boys and Girls Learn Differently


    This course will first focus on examining and discussing various research articles available outlining the differences in the ways males and females learn in the classroom. 

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6020 - Communicating in Decision Making Groups And Interpersonal Relations


    Communicating in Decision Making Groups And Interpersonal Relations

    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6027 - Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum


    This course emphasizes the interdisciplinary approach to all curriculum areas and their related importance to the Reading and Writing process. Students will explore the interconnections of language and literacy to build a knowledge base and understanding of how children learn to read and write in the elementary stages and progress into independent readers and writers in the pper grades. The rationale for this course is two-fold: 1) learning the language arts is important because the elements are powerful tools for learners to create and share personal meaning, and 2) teaching the language arts is critical because the components represent powerful potentials for learners to understand and transform their social worlds. Course content includes a comprehensive approach for educators who are seeking innovative and practical methods targeting best practices for teaching reading and writing across the curriculum spectrum. Students will develop the necessary competencies to understand and implement highly effective strategies that have been thoroughly researched in educational literature pertaining to present day classroom teachers.

    3 credits
  
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    GE 6030 - Theory and Application of Educational Administration


    A comprehensive and historical overview of the field of educational administration and general supervision are presented within this course. An examination of the tasks, processes, role development, models of behavior, communication and techniques of educational administration, designed to assist the prospective school administrator or supervisor in their respective leadership role, is the course’s primary focus.

    3 credits
  
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    GE 6035 - Teaching and Supervising Diverse Student Populations


    This course is designed to enhance instructional skills essential to working with Special Needs populations, Talented and Gifted learners, English Language learners, varying cultures and unique student populations based on the emerging aspects of a diverse society. This course is structured to present the learner with the essential knowledge base and accompanying skills needed to successfully teach school students who have connections with topics related to Special Education, Talented & Gifted Education, the English Language Learners, Bi-Lingual Education, Economically Disadvantaged, Gender Issues, and Racial Diversity by understanding their relationship to student achievement and school climate. Graduate students will study the history, programs and legislation of each program as they relate to school and its daily operation. State requirements will be examined as will program requirements falling under the NCLB legislation. Program design will be presented as will its impact upon the school and the process of meeting the educational needs of students. Case studies and practical application of program specifications will be utilized in the study of this course.

    3 credits
  
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    GE 6040 - Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis


    Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis

    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6055 - Human Development, Communication and Learning


    This course is a comprehensive approach that explores the major theories of learning by tracing their historical development and considers how they relate to modern educational practice. The course describes learning from early childhood through adulthood using the concept of lifelong learning as the intended goal. Major learning theories are applied to the development, implementation and evaluation of program growth as it applies to schools. A companion focus of this course includes individual and group behaviors, communication theory, decision-making, conflict resolution and organizational dynamics as they relate to promoting educational change, staff development, innovation and general school improvement.

    3 credits
  
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    GE 6060 - Organizational Development, Change Theory and Staff Development


    An examination and study of individual and group behaviors as they relate to structuring and managing educational organizations. The student will focus on issues and challenges of organizational dynamics, leadership, system theories, governance and decision-making, communication, change, problem-solving, conflict management and information systems. The concept of staff development will be presented as essential to the forward progress of the organization, in the school setting and as part of the school improvement processes.

    3 credits
  
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    GE 6065 - Leadership and Management of Special Education Programs


    This course examines research and practice related to the development and administration of Special Education programs. It will provide a common language and knowledge of the leadership competencies needed as well as the theory development as it relates to individuals and organizations. The student will analyze existing approaches in schools/organizations with a special emphasis on leadership, decision-making, motivation and creating change. The student will also become familiar with the types and levels of support to address the varying needs of children with disabilities.

    3 credits
  
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    GE 6070 - Instructional Leadership and Supervision


    Roles of contemporary administrative leadership and supervision, with respect to educational program design and management, quality assessment, interpersonal relations, staff effectiveness and the leadership role and process are examined and studied. Through the process of case studies, this course will focus on the skills of leadership decision-making that will help meet the challenges that schools encounter at all levels of leadership.

    3 credits
  
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    GE 6080 - Foundations of Instructional Technology for Teaching and Learning


    This course will provide a hands-on approach to the selected methods of instructional technology within the classroom. Students will engage in computer work and use instructional software to facilitate the learning process. Students will examine and study various methods of instructional technology for classroom teaching and learning. This course will focus on popular technology related issues in current educational settings Students will explore Web and computer-based instructional design software. Students will examine the integration of educational technology into classroom settings through job experiences, Web-based resources, video case studies, and in-class discussions. The goal of the course is to help students achieve a greater understanding of issues and techniques related to the integration of educational technology in K-12 educational settings.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6110 - Principles, Curriculum and Methods


    Principles, Curriculum and Methods

    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6115 - Principles, Methods, Development, and Assessment of Curriculum


    This course examines how curriculum is developed, as well as, the approach to design and implementation. Strategies for collaboration with peer educators and colleagues toward the development and modification, scope and sequence, pacing, spiraling, integration, graphic organization, and mapping will all be an integral part of this course. This course is geared towards classroom teachers who are interested in understanding major American curriculum movements and their underlying philosophies. Coverage spans all major curriculum processes such as development, classroom use, and evaluation by emphasizing the importance of a clearly defined purpose of education as a first step in curriculum development or revision, and as a necessity for classroom use and evaluation.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6120 - The Principalship


    The Principalship

    Prerequisite(s): GE-6030

    3 Credits
  
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    GE 6130 - School and Community Relations


    The focus of this course is an investigation and study of the principles, skills, tasks, practices and communication ability of the school administrator to help maintain open communication between the school and the community. This course is designed to help administrators manage information about their schools and to receive or disseminate it properly. The study of various media and constituents, as well as a variety of experiences relating to the public relations function of the school and district, is treated as a function of administrative leadership.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6136 - Educational Trends and Development


    This course will focus on the major trends in education, as well as, the successes, best practices and the failures of the educational system. The goal of this course is to help students develop into teachers who become reflective practitioners who are well aware of issues pertaining to the educational profession. The course will explore the social, cultural, political, historical, and philosophical contexts of schools, and use the perspective gained as context to consider present day educational issues. Educational issues are pressing concerns in our society. The course will help students develop an understanding of the background of today’s public debates around schooling and will introduce ways in which educational thought and research address big topics. It introduces the students to the various issues affecting teachers. Its primary focus will be on contemporary issues teachers and administrators face in today’s schools. Throughout the course, several aspects of the teaching profession will be incorporated from the diversity of students in the classroom, to school organization and governance, to teaching standards and expectations. This course provides a foundation for understanding the educational profession while staying abreast of current educational trends and changes.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6140 - School Personnel Administration


    A broad, in-depth review of human resources in educational administration is the focus of this course. The quality of a school system’s human resources are given special consideration through the presentation of how members are recruited, selected, inducted, developed, appraised, compensated and protected through justice and bargaining processes. The function of the human resources program as staff developer for programs such as EEOC, affirmative action and the American with Disabilities Act will be the focus of this course.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6150 - Design and Development of Instruction


    Design and Development of Instruction

    Prerequisite(s): GE-6050

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6155 - Design, Development and Assessment of Instruction


    This course is designed to develop a rationale and specific procedures for designing instruction that leads to positive outcomes The course blends current instructional design trends with the latest cognitive psychological research on teaching, testing and assessment. Topics to be considered include current methods of instruction, design and development of teaching, planning tasks, decision-making, testing and assessment and ethical issues that face the evaluator. Sample evaluation criteria will be provided along with real-life examples and a wealth of ideas for implementing the instructional design/assessment process.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6178 - The Special Needs Student


    This course will reflect the education standards for special education promulgated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Students will learn how to best service students with cognitive, behavioral, and/or physical disabilities. The history and legal aspects of Special Education will be a focus of this course. This course is designed to further develop the attitudes, knowledge, and conceptual and technical skills required by teachers to help them identify the educational goals of students and to select or design and implement relevant, meaningful, and beneficial instructional strategies for effective learning by students with special needs. With a continued increase in the special needs population, educators are legally responsible for understanding and carrying out the duties for all special needs students. This course will inform and lend itself to strengthen the skills of teachers to assure they are meeting the elements prescribed for each individual student. This course prepares teachers to become critical thinking professionals who will be able to demonstrate knowledge and awareness of special populations of children with exceptional needs by modeling best teaching practices.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6210 - Curriculum Auditing


    Curriculum Auditing

    Prerequisite(s): Take GE-6110

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6211 - Building Exemplary School Curriculum by Design


    This curriculum course is designed for school leaders who are interested in looking at the reality of school change.  The course is organized around the logic of backward design with the understanding that results are derived from curriculum, assessment, instruction, roles of staff, policies, structures, and the use of resources. Topics include the development of a school mission, the nature of a curriculum for achieving the mission, elements of a re-formed curriculum, an analysis of learning principles, the identification of general roles and job descriptions for teachers and academic leaders, and a practical three-stage backward-design process for reform planning. 

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6212 - Curriculum Management for School Leaders


    This curriculum course is designed for school leaders as they prepare to make choices for the generation of students they are charged to nurture.  The premise of this course is that a new curricular approach begins with rethinking and examining choices based on the tensions between critical points from past practice and challenges for the future. This course is designed in order to consider these tensions within each discipline, in interdisciplinary connections and in applications for future career possibilities - for a curriculum that reflects purposeful practice for all learners. Topics include but are not limited to the new essential curriculum, upgrading the curriculum with 21st century assessment types and skills, upgrading content, new school versions, media and digital literacy, and educating for a sustainable future.

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6220 - School Law


    This course focuses on teachers, their legal authority in the classroom, and the essential knowledge of school law needed for public school educators. School law provides an application of facts, attitudes, and skills necessary for effective performances in specific teaching, supervising, school service, or administrative roles. The course includes an analysis of selected general legal principles, cases, and statute laws. Topics will include copyright and software licensing, privacy and confidentiality, censorship, acceptable use of policies, local and State regulations, the legislative process, school governances, church and state, civil rights, student and parent rights and responsibilities, teacher rights and responsibilities, collective negotiations, tort, contracts, legal research as well as general knowledge of teacher boundaries in the legal sense.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6225 - Special Education Law


    Special Education Law is a core course required of all students participating in a certification program for Supervisors of Special Education. This course will provide an intense review of the regulations and major court decisions under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Special attention will be given to the Pennsylvania regulations and cases in its jurisdiction. It will also include attention to the corresponding legal developments under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the American Disabilities Act (ADA). Students will become versed in the procedures leading to the evaluation, identification and program development (IEP process) for children found eligible to receive special education and the provision of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE).

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6230 - Assessment of Instructional Outcomes


    Assessment of Instructional Outcomes

    Prerequisite(s): Take GE-6040

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6240 - School Finance and Accounting


    This course presents a broad overview and treatment of school finance, school finance reform, school accounting and school resource management Budget development and administration processes are given special attention through the study of funding sources, school accounting systems and practices and the concepts of General Accounting Principles (GAP). Students will also explore school resource management as it impacts the economics of school program.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6244 - Learning as a Process


    This course will provide an overview of the establishment of human development and the relationship to learning over one’s life span. A careful analysis delving into a range of cognitive learning theories, practices of effecting learning, steps of the assessment process, and appropriate goal setting for specific life learning stages will be the focus of this course. The course will focus on the concepts and principles that are important to educational practitioners by revealing practical implications of developmental theory and research by providing concrete applications for those who teach and work with children and adolescents.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6247 - Action Research I


    This course will be the first of two required courses in Action Research. Students will engage in the process of reflection, inquiry, and action in their own professional context. This course will assist the students in the development and planning phases of Chapters 1 and 2 of the action research project. Action research is an interactive inquiry process that balances problem solving actions implemented in a collaborative context with data-driven collaborative analysis or research to understand underlying causes enabling future predictions about organizational change (Reason & Bradbury, 2001). The various roles and skills necessary to be an effective action researcher in the field of education will be discussed alongside of understanding proper research methodologies regarding the creation of a clear, concise research question, finding an appropriate sample population, researching the topic adequately in a graduate level, providing validity of data findings, and conceptualizing results in a manner that brings forth adequate conclusions. Topics include identifying problems to investigate, selecting appropriate research methods, collecting and analyzing data, and drawing conclusions from the research. The major assignment for the course will be the completion of Chapters 1 and 2 undertaken in an educational setting in which the student is engaged in professional practice.

    3 credits
  
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    GE 6250 - Curriculumn and Strategies foryInstructing Students With Special Needs


    This course is a comprehensive study of the theories, research-based diagnosis, instructional planning and the organization of instruction for students with diverse learning and physical challenges as well as those with adaptive and functional needs.

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6260 - Introduction to Transition ServicesyIn Special Education


    The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction and overview of programs, services and legal knowledge surrounding the transition of students with disabilities. 

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6262 - Assessment Models for Transistion And Vocation


    This course is designed to provide students with a breadth of knowledge and skills related to vocational assessment models and paradigms for transition, post secondary education, and vocational opportunities. 

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6264 - Transition and Vocational Curriculum For School-Based Services


    Students will learn to view transition and vocational goals and instruction for the population through the lens of Universal Design. 

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6268 - Interagency Knowledge and CollaborationyInstructing Students With Special Needs


    The purpose of this course is to examine the various facets of collaboration involved in planning and creating opportunities for transition and vocation. 

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6270 - Applied Behavior Analysis and Positive Behavior Supports


    The purpose of this course is to provide class participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop, implement, and evaluate the impact of positive behavior support for students with special needs. 

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6280 - Technology and Universal Design for Special Education Students


    The state of technology as we enter the new millennium allows for “easy access” in a “user friendly” environment. The rationale for this course focuses on the goal of preparing thoughtful and responsive educators who can take on the unique challenges inherent in the diversity of today’s classroom. 

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6282 - Assistive Technology: Devices & Services Instructing Students With Special Needs


    This course provides a look at high and low technology utilized by students with a wide range of educational, physical, and communication needs.

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6284 - Assistive Technology: Planning Collaboration, & Implementation


    This course investigates a team approach to implementation of Assistive Technology for student and classroom use. Establishment of the team and the process will be outlined to develop assessment, training and implementation guidelines for IEP driven goals. 

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6288 - Assistive Technology Capstone Instructing Students With Special Needs


    Capstone course for the program. 

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6300 - Comprehensive Examination


    Comprehensive Examination

    0 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6300 - Comprehensive Examination


    Comprehensive Examination

    0 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6350 - Action Research II


    This seminar will focus on the research design, methods, tools and measurements of the action research project. Chapters 3 - 5 of the student’s actions research project will be completed during this course. This course will be the second required course in Action Research. It will focus on the research design, methods, tools, and measurements of the action research project. The course will assist the students in the development and planning phases of Chapters 3, 4, and 5 of the action research project. Action research is an interactive inquiry process that balances problem solving actions implemented in a collaborative context with data-driven collaborative analysis or research to understand underlying causes enabling future predictions about organizational change (Reason & Bradbury, 2001). The various roles and skills necessary to be an effective action researcher in the field of education will be discussed alongside of understanding proper research methodologies regarding the population, sample size, data analyses, results, conclusions, limitations, and future recommendations of the research study which will comprise the final chapters of the action research project. Topics include conducting an actual study, employing quantitative or qualitative measures to analyze the data points, reporting results, testing if one’s hypotheses were correct, and providing a summary of the process by drawing conclusions from the research. The major assignment for the course will be the completion of Chapters 3, 4, and 5 undertaken in an educational setting in which the student is engaged in professional practice.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    GE 6400 - Bullying Prevention in Schools


    Bullying Prevention in Schools

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    GE 6402 - Bystanders & Bullying Prevention


    Bystanders & Bullying Prevention

    3 Credits
 

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