Nov 29, 2021  
2018-2019 Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Dairy Science

  
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    DS 1065 - Principles of Dairy Science


    This course is a study of the extent and importance of the dairy industry in the U.S. It is designed to develop an understanding of the principles of nutrition, breeding, selection, records, and improvement programs employed by the dairy industry. Attention is also given to milk quality and the spectrum of dairy products.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Lab
    3 credits
  
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    DS 2213 - Dairy Cattle Judging


    The judging of dairy cattle for the purpose of understanding ideal dairy type and applying type as a measure of utility is considered. Introduction to oral reasons in defense of placing a class of dairy animals is discussed and how to deliver an effective set of oral reasons is presented.

    3 hours Laboratory
    1 credit
  
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    DS 2230 - Physiology of Lactation


    This course is a study of the anatomy and physiology of the mammary gland. Special emphasis is placed on the hormonal control of mammary growth and on the initiation and maintenance of lactation. Consideration is also given to the biochemistry of milk secretion and factors affecting milk yield and composition.

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    DS 3000 - Selected Topics I


    Special projects designed to meet individual needs of students in the specialized fields of agriculture. Projects will be arranged on a one-to-one basis with a department faculty member and with the approval of the Department Chairperson. Total Selected Topics credit accepted toward graduation is limited to 2 credits.

    3 hours of student/faculty instruction per week
    1 credit
  
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    DS 3010 - Animal Feeding and Nutrition


    A comprehensive study is presented of the principles of animal nutrition and how different kinds of feeds are used in the formulation of rations for farm animals. Attention is given to the methods that are used in feeding all large animals in relation to their different digestive systems. Major emphasis is placed on the practice of developing rations for farm animals.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 4106 - Principles of Animal Nutrition  or Permission of Instructor.

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    DS 3029 - Dairy and Livestock Genetics


    The study of factors responsible for changes in the genetic composition of animal populations is presented. Using current concepts in genetics and statistics, the relationships of both heredity and environment to individual performance are considered. Various mating systems and their consequences on animal production are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): BY 1116 - Biological Science I  and AS 1006 - Introduction to Animal Science .

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
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    DS 4000 - Selected Topics II


    Special projects designed to meet individual needs of students in the specialized fields of agriculture. Projects will be arranged on a one-to-one basis with a department faculty member and with the approval of the Department Chairperson. Total Selected Topics credit accepted toward graduation is limited to 2 credits.

    3 hours of student/faculty instruction per week
    1 credit
  
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    DS 4115 - Seminar (Dairy Science)


    A study of the technical and scientific literature in the field of Dairy Science with special emphasis on discussion of the literature reviewed.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior status.

    1 hour Lecture and Discussion
    1 credit
  
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    DS 4116 - Advanced Dairy Judging


    This course provides intensive training in selection of dairy cattle using subjective and objective measurements as well as the use of oral reasons to explain and defend decisions. An Intercollegiate Dairy Judging Team is selected from students taking this course. Due to considerable travel and time required, enrollment is limited and a 2.0 academic average is required. This course begins one week prior to the start of the Fall Semester.

    Prerequisite(s): DS 2213 - Dairy Cattle Judging  and Permission of Instructor.

    3 hours Lab
    1 credit
  
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    DS 4134 - Physiology of Reproduction


    This course covers the physiology of reproduction in farm animals. The sexual characteristics of the male and female, the physiology of the semen and ova, hormonal control of reproduction, and reproduction in each of the farm species are discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): AS 3118 - Animal Anatomy and Physiology  or ES 3217 - Equine Anatomy and Physiology .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
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    DS 4230 - Dairy Business Analysis


    Dairy Business Analysis

    Prerequisite(s): Take DS-4230L

    3 Credits
  
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    DS 4235 - Dairy Systems and Management


    A comprehensive study of the business of dairy farming and the dairy industry, including pertinent economic, nutritional, and environmental problems.

    Prerequisite(s): DS 3010 - Animal Feeding and Nutrition .

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    3 credits

Dairy Science: Specialized Methods and Techniques

  
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    DS 3226 - Dairy Husbandry Techniques I


    This course covers the application of hormones, feed additives, chemicals and drugs in the feeding, breeding and management of dairy animals. The student works with various dairy improvement programs. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the general care and management of dairy animals.

    Co-requisite: DS 3010 - Animal Feeding and Nutrition  or Permission of Instructor.

    1 hour Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    2 credits
  
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    DS 4143 - Dairy Husbandry Techniques II


    This course is a continuation of DS 3226  and incorporates the practical aspects of dairy cattle management, mastitis control, feeding and breeding. Students are involved in heat detection, feeding and milking as well as the study of Dairy Herd Improvement proceedings.

    Prerequisite(s): DS 3226 - Dairy Husbandry Techniques I  or Permission of Instructor.

    1 hour Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory
    2 credits
  
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    SR 4041 - Student Research


    This course is designed for students of all majors who are of sophomore status and above with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 and who have a serious desire and potential to undertake a research project. After obtaining the approval of a faculty mentor, students intending to register for Student Research will need to submit a 1-2 page proposal to the Student Research Committee for approval. Proposals should include an abstract, project timeline, budget, and any funding requests. For registration in the fall semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than April 20 and for registration in the spring semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than Nov. 20. Once approved, registration is through the student’s departmental chair. Students, mentors and committee members will meet throughout the semester, with student presentations at the end of the semester.

    Contact hours dependent on number of credits registered for this course
    1-3 credits

Education

  
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    ED 0015 - College Reading


    The needs of the students enrolled in this course will determine the techniques used to build skill in reading. Included among the skills to be developed will be: recognizing stated and implied ideas, designating major and minor supporting details, identifying types of sequencing and appropriate ordering, restating questions, using contextual clues, and differentiating literal and inferential information.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 institutional credits (Institutional credit will not be applied to either required or elective credits, but will be counted toward determining full-time status)
  
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    ED 0016 - Learning Strategies


    This course involves instruction and practice in techniques of time management, notetaking, reading for greater retention, test taking and memory. Students identify and use a range of campus and community resources, including the library. Effective listening techniques and communication skills are presented as well as ways to enhance creativity and stimulate critical thinking. Students explore their own styles of learning and personal value systems as they contribute to becoming successful students.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 institutional credits (Institutional credits will not be applied to either required or elective credits, but will be counted toward determining full-time status)
  
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    ED 0018 - CHOICES Seminar


    CHOICES students will continue to integrate skills gained in Learning Strategies and apply them across the curriculum through structured activities. Students will continue to clarify academic career and personal goals as well as develop skills in rational analysis and critical thinking. The seminar will maintain focus on the students’ selection of a major and assist in the transition process. This course is limited to CHOICES students.

    2 hours Lecture and Discussion
    2 institutional credits (Institutional credits will not be applied to either required or elective credits, but will be counted toward determining full-time status)
  
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    ED 1010 - American Education


    This course examines American education with emphasis the history, aims, organization, and control of public schools. Emphasis is placed on the development of American educational ideas and institutions in a multicultural society. The course will address current topics in education, and should be taken as the first Education course.

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and 10 hours Field Experience/Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 1020 - Field Experience Lab I


    1 hours  Lecture, Discussion and Field  Experience/Observation - 0 credits

    0 Credits
  
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    ED 2020 - Field Experience Lab II


    1 hours  Lecture, Discussion and Field  Experience/Observation - 0 credits

    0 Credits
  
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    ED 2030 - Educational Psychology


    Cross-Listed As: LA 2230

    This course is a practical treatment of the theory and practice of psychology as it applies to teaching, learning, student development and the classroom environment. Topics include: growth and development, learning and achievement, motivation, learning disabilities and psychoeducational aspects of adolescents. This course should be taken as the second Education course.

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and 10 hours Field Experience/Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 2040 - Field Experience/Pre-Student Teaching


    Practical experiences in the classroom and the school prior to student teaching are designed to acquaint the student with classroom problems and school practices. Students have direct experience with pupils and educational professionals on a paraprofessional basis through organized activities. Minimum 30 clock hours.

    Prerequisite(s): ED 1010 , ED 2030  and ED 2110.

    1 hour Lecture, Discussion and Practicum
    1 credit
  
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    ED 2142 - Instructional Methods and Assessment


    This course is a study of teaching procedures and learning activities in the secondary school. Students will explore methodology for creating a learning situation, developing the subject matter and teaching field, using appropriate methods and techniques, and classroom management. Student will be guided in the analysis of specific content and techniques for teaching that content, and will critically examine lesson plans.

    Prerequisite(s):   and  .

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion, and 10 hours Field Experience/Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 2210 - Literacy in the Content Area Classroom


    This course addresses the theories and methods of literacy instruction in content area classrooms. Students will examine, develop and apply best practices in the skills of reading and writing in their content areas. The course prepares students to understand the demands of academic literacy in the secondary classroom. Reading assessments and literacy strategies are designed to increase adolescent vocabulary acquisition/learning and comprehension of content text.

    Prerequisite(s): ED 1010 - American Education  ,   and   .

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and minimum 10 hours Field Experience/Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 3000 - Selected Topics in Education


    Selected projects and activities designed to meet individual needs of junior and senior students in specialized fields within education studies. Projects will be arranged with a department faculty member and the approval of the department chair. Prerequisite:Permission of the Department Chairperson. Minimum 3 hours of effort per week per credit - limited to 2 credits.

    3 Hours
    1 Credit
  
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    ED 3010 - Instructional Methods & Assessment


    A study of teaching procedures and learning activities in the secondary school; a critical examination of lesson plans. Methodology for creating a learning situation, developing the subject matter and teaching field, use of appropriate methods and techniques, and classroom management. Student will be guided in the analysis of specific content and techniques for teaching that content. 147Micro teaching148 experience. Prerequisites: American Education, Educational Psychology, and Practicum I.  Also, students must have junior status, be formally accepted into the certificate program and have achieved passing scores on Praxis Level I tests. 3 hours Lecture and Discussion.

    Prereq/Corequisite Prequisites: ED 1010  and ED-2230

    3 Credits
  
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    ED 3020 - Field Experience Lab III


    1 hours  Lecture, Discussion and Field  Experience/Observation - 0 credits

    1 Hour Lecture
    0 Credits
  
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    ED 3040 - Field Exp/Pre-Student Teaching


    Practical experiences in the classroom and the school prior to student teaching designed to acquaint the student with classroom problems and school problems and school practices. Direct experience with pupils and educational professionals in the school on a paraprofessional basis through organized activities. Minimum 40 clock hours 15120 hours in the sophomore and the junior years respectively. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and American Education.  1-2 hours Lecture, Discussion and Practicum


    1 Hour Lecture
    1
  
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    ED 3120 - Tests and Measurements


    Course is designed to acquaint the student with intelligence and achievement tests and to give a working knowledge of various standard tests and scales available for classroom use. In addition, elementary statistics, construction of teacher-made tests, and performance assessment will be studied. Prerequisite: American Education. Also, students must have junior status, be formally accepted into the certificate program and have achieved passing scores on Praxis Level I tests. 3 hours Lecture and Discussion  


    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    ED 3230 - ELL and the Multicultural Classroom


    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of English Language Learners’ language acquisition and the impact on content area learning. It will address linguistic and cultural backgrounds of ELLs and the strategies necessary for teaching content and assessing learning in the inclusive classroom. The course will emphasize components of curriculum content, teaching techniques, second language literacy, and the development and evaluation of teaching materials. It is also designed to introduce teachers to issues in cultural diversity by taking a comprehensive look at research, policy, and effective practices.

    Prerequisite(s): ED 1010 , ED 2030 , ED 2142  and ED 2210 . Students must have been formally accepted into the Certificate program.

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and minimum 10 hours Field Experience/Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 3230 - ELL/ MC Classroom


    Students will develop an understanding of our multicultural-pluralistic society and acquire the pedagogical skills and concepts needed to provide optimum learning opportunities for all students in the secondary classroom. Prerequisites: American Education and Educational Psychology.  Also, students must have junior status, be formally accepted into the certificate program and have achieved passing scores on Praxis Level I tests. 3 hours Lecture and Discussion 


    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    ED 3327 - Differentiated Instruction in the Inclusive Classroom


    This course provides an overview of the identification of differentiating characteristics of exceptional adolescence. Theories and instructional strategies will be explored for the inclusive classroom. Legislative policies, nondiscriminatory assessment, individualized educational plans and parent involvement will also be addressed. The course will define the roles and responsibilities of the classroom teachers, special educators and other support personnel in relation to the delivery of instruction and special education services in the inclusive setting.

    Prerequisite(s):   and   .   is recommended. Students must have been formally accepted into the Certificate program.

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and minimum 10 hours Field Experience/ Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 4010 - Student Teaching and Professional Seminar


    Students will spend the semester in an approved secondary school under the direct supervision of a cooperating teacher. Students will meet regularly with their supervisor.

    12 credits
  
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    ED 4025 - Student Teaching Seminar


    Student Teaching Seminar

    3 Hours ecture
    3
  
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    ED 4030 - Student Teaching Practicum


    Student Teaching Practicum

    3 Hours Lecture
    3

Education: Special Methods in the Content Areas

  
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    ED 3011 - Teaching Science: Methods and Experiences


    This course is a study of various methodologies and experiences unique to the teaching of science at the secondary level.

    Prerequisite(s): ED 1010  and   . Students must have been formally accepted into the Certificate program.

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and minimum 10 hours Field Experience/ Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 3012 - Teaching Mathematics: Methods and Experiences


    This course is a study of various methodologies and experiences unique to the teaching of mathematics at the secondary level.

    Prerequisite(s): ED 1010 - American Education  and   . Students must have been formally accepted into the Certificate program.

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and minimum 10 hours Field Experience/Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 3013 - Teaching English: Methods and Experiences


    This course is a study of various methodologies and experiences unique to the teaching of English at the secondary level.

    Prerequisite(s):   and ED 2030 - Educational Psychology  . Students must have been formally accepted into the Certificate program.

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and minimum 10 hours Field Experience/ Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 3014 - Teaching Agriculture: Methods and Experiences


    This course is a study of various methodologies and experiences unique to the teaching of agriculture at the secondary level.

    Prerequisite(s):   and ED 2030 - Educational Psychology  . Students must have been formally accepted into the Certificate program.

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and minimum 10 hours Field Experience/Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 3015 - Teaching Business: Methods and Experiences


    This course is a study of various methodologies and experiences unique to the teaching of business at the secondary level.

    Prerequisite(s):   and   . Students must have been formally accepted into the Certificate program.

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and minimum 10 hours Field Experience/Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 3016 - Teaching Social Studies: Methods and Experiences


    This course is a study of various methodologies and experiences unique to the teaching of Social Studies at the secondary level.

    Prerequisite(s):   and   . Students must have been formally accepted into the Certificate program.

    3 hours Lecture, Discussion and minimum 10 hours Field Experience/Observation
    3 credits
  
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    ED 3050 - Animals in the Public Eye


    Cross-Listed As: SA 3050

    Students in the Animal Biotechnology & Conservation Department will be faced with the responsibility of presenting the general public with accurate and understandable information on a daily basis. This information is most likely to be imparted through animal or artifact demonstrations in informal educational settings through one-on-one discussions (talking to the public), and small group presentations (keeper presentations, State Fairs). In addition, they are likely to be called upon to represent their institutions to the media during their careers. The course will provide experiential learning and will include animal/artifact presentations.

    3 hours lecture
    3 credits
  
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    SR 4041 - Student Research


    This course is designed for students of all majors who are of sophomore status and above with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 and who have a serious desire and potential to undertake a research project. After obtaining the approval of a faculty mentor, students intending to register for Student Research will need to submit a 1-2 page proposal to the Student Research Committee for approval. Proposals should include an abstract, project time line, budget, and any funding requests. For registration in the fall semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than April 20th and for registration in the spring semester, a proposal should be submitted no later than Nov. 20th. Once approved, registration is through the student’s departmental chair. Students, mentors and committee members will meet throughout the semester, with student presentations at the end of the semester.

    Contact hours dependent on number of credits registered for this course
    1-3 credits

English

  
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    ED 4020 - Field Experience Lab IV


    1 hours  Lecture, Discussion and Field  Experience/Observation - 0 credits

    1 Hour Lecture
    0 Credits
  
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    EN 0012 - English Essentials


    This course provides intensive training in grammar and syntax for students who require assistance in written expression. The course objectives include a review of the fundamentals of grammar and improvement of sentence structure. Students assigned to this course are required to take EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  in addition.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 institutional credits (Institutional credit will not be applied to either required or elective credits, but will be counted toward determining full-time status)
  
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    EN 12 - Writing Fundamentals


    Students build fluency and confidence as college-level readers and writers by working on the features of an academic essay: engaging introduction, clear thesis, well-organized body paragraphs, solid use of evidence and correct mechanics. Students review the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation and sentence structure, learning how to read and edit their papers for mistakes that interfere with clarity and comprehension.  - 3 institutional credits   (Institutional  credit   will   not  be  applied  to either  required or elective credits,  but will be counted toward  determining full-time  status.)
     
     
     
     
     


    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    EN 1045 - English as a Second Language


    This course is open to students for whom English is a second language. Such students should take this course instead of Developmental English. It covers fundamentals of grammar, writing, and reading.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 institutional credits (Institutional credit will not be applied to either required or elective credits, but will be counted toward determining full-time status)
  
  •  

    EN 1101 - College Writing I


    Students write several academic essays for diverse audiences and purposes, writing through a
    process that involves brainstorming, drafting, receiving feedback and substantive revising.
    Students move beyond the standard “five paragraph theme” learned in high school, with greater
    emphasis on originality, critical thinking, personal style and vocabulary. Students develop
    peer feedback techniques and learn strategies for reading, annotating and responding to texts.
    Prerequisite: Passing grade in Fundamentals of Writing or the placement criteria required for
    entering students.  3 hours  Lecture and Discussion - 3

    Prerequisite(s): Passage of EN 0012 - English Essentials  or the placement test, required for entering students.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 1111 - Advanced English I


    Literary interpretation, research, and writing are taught in this course. The essay and longer research paper are emphasized. The course replaces English I for certain advanced students. With permission of the Department Chairperson, students who complete this course may substitute another literature course for Introduction to Literature. Requirement: Placement score indicating advanced writing skills.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 1115 - Introduction to Communication


    This course explores the principles and contexts of human communication. It addresses the concepts of self, group, mass media, gender and intercultural communication. Students will study theory and analyze case studies to develop a working vocabulary for critical thinking about communication issues.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 1201 - College Writing II


    Students build on the skills of drafting and revising developed in EN 1101, applying them to
    longer essays that incorporate multiple sources and that involve analysis, synthesis and critical
    thinking. Students study how to formulate a valid research question and thesis, analyze methods of
    logic and argumentation, and practice rhetorical strategies for crafting essays that affect real
    readers. Students learn how to evaluate, incorporate and document scholarly sources., how
    to use the library’s electronic databases, and how to maintain their own voice and point of view
    when writing researched essays that call for more than easy answers or mere opinions.  3
    hours. Lecture  and  Discussion - 3 credits.

    Prerequisite(s):   

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing


    Students in Advanced College Writing partake in a rigorous, accelerated course that combines elements of College Writing I and II. Students sharpen recursive writing habits as they practice composing personal, analytical, and argumentative essays at the college level, learning to write with substance, style, and precision. Students then apply these skills and strategies in the production of a researched essay that involves developing a valid research question and thesis, locating, evaluating, and integrating sources to shape an argument that calls for more than easy answers or mere opinions. The course is reserved for students entering the University with the requisite score on the AP English Language and Composition exam. This course satisfies the first-year writing requirement. 3 hours Lecture and Discussion - 3 credits

    Prerequisite(s):   

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 2005 - History of the English Language


    This course examines the external history of the English language - the political, social and technological forces that have shaped it, as well as the internal history - the effects of those forces on the sound system (phonology), structure (syntax) and vocabulary. Chronologically arranged texts from Old English to Present-Day English serve as sample material for the course.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  
  
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    EN 2043 - Semantics and Semiotics


    This course explores language forms and establishes the relationships between signs and symbols and what they represent. It covers the use and abuse of verbal and non-verbal language and applies semantic/semiotic principles to the language of politics, popular culture, advertising, and prejudice. The course objectives include familiarizing students with the nature of language meaning, alerting them to language abuses, and enhancing their communications skills.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 2129 - The Structure of English


    The course provides intensive training in both grammar and methods of teaching grammar (particularly at the secondary level). The course objectives include: an introduction to traditional grammar terminology, sentence structure, various grammatical theories, and multiple approaches to grammar instruction for secondary school teachers and English majors.

    Prereq/Corequisite   and   or  

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  
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    EN 2134 - Literary Interpretation


    This course provides the English major with the vocabulary of literary criticism, with a basic understanding of generic forms, and with a specific knowledge of significant poems, stories, short novels, a novel and a play. Short papers and an essay final test are assigned to cover the required material.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and   or  

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 2135 - Classic and Medieval Literature


    This course will cover Western literature from its earliest literary works through the Greek and Roman eras, and the Medieval period up to the Renaissance. Students will become familiar with major writers through selected texts. In addition, they will be presented with the necessary philosophical, historical and mythological background. Students will demonstrate ability by reading, analyzing, discussing, and writing about the literature.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1111 - Advanced English I  and EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  
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    EN 2138 - World Literature


    This course will examine literary texts from around the world, with particular attention to the emergence of national and ethnic voices in the twentieth century. Students will become familiar with issues of modernism and postmodernism, and post-colonialism as reflected in literature from the areas of the course’s primary literary focus: Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 2139 - Media Management


    This course is designed to provide the student a broad overview of the business of media and journalism. Media ethics and law will provide a theoretical framework for the course, which will use case studies to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental challenges facing media managers in the digital age.

    Prereq/Corequisite   and   or  

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 2140 - Graphic Design I


    This course introduces the interaction of text and image and the fundamental components of graphic communication. Students will develop and hone skills in working with text and image (Adobe Illustrator & Photoshop) as they create solutions to a series of design problems. Visual literacy will be increased through exposure to contemporary design issues and graphic design history. Students will be expected to expand their proficiency in all aspects of the design process, including the use of formal design principles, type as image, creative brainstorming, conceptualizing, critical thinking, collaboration, and presentation. 3 hours Lecture and Discussion - 3 credits

    3 Hours LEcture
    3
  
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    EN 2220 - Introduction to Film


    This course will introduce students to the critical interpretation of film as a narrative form and cultural product. The textual analysis of film involves examining the formal aspects of the medium - e.g., screenwriting, acting, cinematography, editing, mise-en-scene, narrative and sound - through a variety of theoretical and critical approaches. Students successfully completing this course will have improved their ability to communicate by using writing as a means of personal discovery and intellectual growth, as well as a practical method for recording what has been learned; they will also have garnered a fuller understanding of how to evaluate, apply and experiment with the intersection of visual and textual narratives. Prerequisites: College Writing I and II. This course may be substituted for EN 2028 with approval of English Department Chair.

    Prerequisite(s):   Take EN-1101 EN-1201 or EN-1211

    3 Credits
  
  •  

    EN 2230 - Intro to Poetry


    Intro to Poetry 

    3 Hours
    3 Credits
  
  
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    EN 2239 - Graphic Design II


    Further emphasis will be placed on the relationship between text and image through a series of design-based problems. Continued emphasis will be placed on the use of formal design principles, type as image, creative brainstorming, conceptualizing, critical thinking, collaboration, and presentation. Concepts in multi-page layout and cohesive design (Adobe InDesign) will be stressed in this advanced course. Students will also research and investigate opportunities in careers related to graphic design. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I. 3 hours Lecture and Discussion.

    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    EN 2242 - News Reporting and Writing


    This course is designed to introduce the student to writing for newspapers and magazines in both print and online format. Emphasis will be placed on cultivating story ideas, interviewing sources, quoting sources, and writing using Associated Press (AP) style. Students will learn the skills of basic news writing to include both hard news and feature stories and will appreciate the differences between writing for hardcopy and online publications.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 2290 - Special Topics Genre


    Special Topics Genre

    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    EN 2310 - British Literature I


    British Literature I

    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    EN 2320 - British Literature II


    British Literature II

    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
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    EN 3005 - History of the English Language


    This course  examines the external history  of the English language - the political, social  and  technological forces that have  shaped it, as well  as the internal  history  - the effects  of those  forces  on  the  sound  system  (phonol- ogy), structure  (syntax) and vocabulary. Chronologically arranged texts from Old English to Present-Day English serve  as sample material for the course. Prerequisite: English  I and  II or Advanced English  I and  II. 3 hours Lecture and Discussion

    Prerequisite(s): TAKE EN-1101 EN-1201 OR EN-1211

    3 Credits
  
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    EN 3010 - Adolescent and Young Adult Literature


    This course is an introduction to literature written for adolescents and young adults. It discusses the psychological needs of the young reader, addresses methods of evaluation and presentation, and familiarizes students with electronic resources in this field. Issues such as censorship, community standards, mass media and popular culture are also covered.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1111 - Advanced English I  and EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  
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    EN 3030 - Shakespeare


    The course attempts to take the student into depth on one author. It will look at the social background of Shakespeare’s time, his life, and his works. The course will also cover textual problems, methods of interpretation, and significant critical approaches.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
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    EN 3031 - Introduction to Film


    The course will familiarize the student with film techniques and terminology. The history of film and development of styles will be studied. The student will learn to demonstrate critical abilities in viewing, discussion, and writing.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    2 hours Lecture and Discussion and 2 hours Laboratory
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3037 - The Gleaner


    The Gleaner is DelVal’s literary and artistic journal. Students and faculty contribute poetry, short fiction, photography, and art for publication. The Gleaner staff works closely with a professional printer and gains hands-on instruction in layout and design techniques. The staff selects material, determines the best layout, chooses student prize winners, and presents the journal and prizes at the annual Gleaner Gala.

    1/2 credit
    Graded Pass/Fail
  
  •  

    EN 3040 - Digital Photography and Editing


    This course is designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles and techniques of digital photography. Students will learn to use all of the features of a standard digital camera. Some of the areas of focus will be: depth of field, lighting techniques, motion portraiture, composition, location analysis, and digital image processing. Additionally, students will develop skills in digital photo editing and production for projects with specific themes and applications.

    3 hours lecture and Laboratory
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3050 - Contemporary Literature in English


    In an effort to familiarize students with contemporary literature in English, texts will be studied from the second half of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first. Works from Australia, India, South Africa, the Caribbean, New Zealand, and Canada will be featured in addition to works from America and England.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3051 - Professional Communication


    This course offers the elements of effective business communications and communication theory. In written assignments, exercises, and class discussion, students will analyze intended audience(s) of documents, write, research, and format letters, memos, and short reports, participate in collaborative team projects, and develop skills of oral communication.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3055 - English Renaissance and Enlightenment Literature


    The course emphasizes the inventiveness and humanism of the Renaissance period in dramatic and poetic works. The shift to satire, the essay, and the invention of the novel are discussed in the second part of the course. Major writers such as Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Swift, and Johnson will be emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3056 - Technical Writing


    This course introduces the student to technical writing, a form of communication that is employed on-the-job in the scientific and technological fields. Topics include writing technical letters, memoranda, resumes, instructions, proposals, and research reports. The purpose of technical writing-to convey factual information in an unambiguous way-demands clear, direct and specific writing.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3060 - Theory of Writing


    This course examines competing theories of the writing process and of the methods used to teach writing. Students will study the rise of expressivism in the 1960s, and the influence of cognitive, social constructionist, feminist and post-colonial theories on language and learning, including an overview of how college writing centers have been shaped by these movements. Through a series of scholarly readings both theoretical and practical, students gain a richer understanding of their own writing processes; explore shifting perceptions of the relationship between the writer, the subject, and the audience; develop a greater understanding of writing as a mode of thinking and learning; and recognize the collaborative nature of writing and knowledge-making. Prerequisite: EN1201 or EN1211. 3 hours Lecture and Discussion - 3 credits

    Prereq/Corequisite Take EN-1101 EN-1201 or EN-1211

    3 Hours Lecture
    3 Credits
  
  •  

    EN 3070 - Linguistics


    This course  provides an overview of how humans acquire and  use  language. The  components of language  are   examined,  as   well    as   the   princi- ples,  concepts and models of language acquisition. Prerequisites: English  I and  II or  Advanced  English I and  II. 3 hours  Lecture  and  Discussion - 3 credits

    Prerequisite(s): Take EN-1101 EN-1201 or EN-1211

    3 Hours Lecture
    3 Credits
  
  •  

    EN 3090 - Special Topics in Writing


    Special Topics in Writing

    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
  •  

    EN 3130 - World Literature


    This  course  will  examine literary  texts  from  around the world,  with  particular attention  to the emergence of national and ethnic  voices  in the twentieth century. Students  will  become familiar  with issues  of modern- ism   and   postmodernism,  and   post-colonialism as reflected in literature from the areas  of the course’s primary  literary  focus: Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Prerequisites: English  I and  II or  Advanced  English I and  II. 3 hours  lecture  and  discussion - 3 credits

    Prerequisite(s): Take EN-1101 EN-1201 or EN-1211

    3 Hours Lecture
    3 Credits
  
  •  

    EN 3144 - Writing for Public Relations, Promotion and Advertising


    This course is designed to introduce the student to the various kinds of writing used in public relations, marketing, promotion, and advertising including instruction in: preparing news releases, press statements, feature stories, product articles, newsletters, fund-raising literature, cover letters in direct mail campaigns, and annual reports. Emphasis will be placed on writing and practicing marketing, public relations, and advertising within the “new media” environment.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3210 - Classical Literature


    This  course   will   cover   Western   literature  from  its earliest literary  works  through  the Greek  and  Roman eras,  and  the Medieval period  up to the Renaissance. Students   will   become  familiar   with   major   writers through  selected texts. In addition, they  will  be presented with the necessary philosophical, historical and  mythological background. Students  will  demon- strate ability  by reading, analyzing, discussing, and writing   about   the  literature.  Prerequisite:  English  I and  II or Advanced English  I and  II. 3 hours  Lecture and  Discussion - 3 credits

    Prerequisite(s): Take EN-1101 EN-1201 or EN-1211

    3 Hours Lecture
    3 Credits
  
  •  

    EN 3235 - Mass Communications


    A course designed to introduce the fundamentals, theories and impact of contemporary mass media. The course surveys mass media systems with a focus upon how they operate in American culture. Emphasis is placed upon the contemporary growth of the print, film, radio, television, and recording industries, and on how these media have altered and influenced our lives.

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3246 - Writing for Radio, Television and the Internet


    Students will examine the format, structure, pacing, and style of scripts for radio, television and the internet and will produce scripts representing at least three genres. In addition, they will evaluate the role of the script writer in the public media.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3265 - Creative Writing


    This course is aimed at two audiences: those who have a specific interest in creative writing and want to develop their skills further, and those whose primary interest is in interpreting literature. Literary texts and the students’ own experiences serve as the basis for writing.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3310 - Classical Literature


    This course will cover Western literature from its earliest literary works through the Greek and Roman eras, and the Medieval period up to the Renaissance. Students will become familiar with major writers through selected texts. In addition, they will be presented with the necessary philosophical, historical and mythological background. Students will demon- strate ability by reading, analyzing, discussing, and writing about the literature. Prerequisite: English I and II or Advanced English I and II.

    Prerequisite(s): Take EN 1101 - College Writing I    and EN 1201 - College Writing II   or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 3410 - African American Literature


    African American Literature

    3 Hours LEcture
    3
  
  •  

    EN 3420 - Women’s Literature


    Women’s Literature

    3 Hours Lecture
    3
  
  •  

    EN 4000 - Selected Topics in English


    Special projects designed to meet individual needs of senior students in specialized fields within English or Media and Communications. Projects will be arranged with a department faculty member and with the approval of the department chairperson.



    Prerequisite(s): Take EN 1101 EN 1201  or EN 1211 .

    Minimum of 3 hours of effort per week per credit
    2 credits

  
  •  

    EN 4000 - Selected Topics in English


    Special projects designed to meet individual needs of senior students in specialized fields  within English or Media and Communications.  Projects will be arranged with a department faculty member and with the approval of the department chairperson. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chairperson. Minimum 3 hours of effort per week per credit - limited to 2 credits.
     
     
     


    0 Hours Lecture
    2
  
  •  

    EN 4010 - Critical Theory


    By examining the history of literary criticism and selected texts by contemporary and older literary critics, this course acquaints the student with critical terms, schools of critical theory, analytic procedures and the history of criticism. Students will apply several critical methods to literary works.

    Prerequisite(s): EN 1101 - College Writing I  and EN 1201 - College Writing II  or EN 1211 - Advanced College Writing .

    3 hours Lecture and Discussion
    3 credits
  
  •  

    EN 4015 - Video Production I


    This course introduces students to the techniques of single camera video production in a multimedia environment. Instruction will cover the production process from program conceptualization, script and storyboard development, preproduction planning, single camera field production non-linear editing and audio mixing. Students will work individually and in teams to complete assignments.

    3 hours - lecture and Laboratory
    3 credits
 

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